Tag Archives: Constitution

Pitfalls to Abbott’s Call for Convention of States

Republican politicians have made repeated promises to restrain federal power through appointing justices who ‘will not legislate from the bench,’ or by passing laws to restrict federal power or rein in the president, but such efforts always fall flat. Rather than further more empty promises or place false hope in a long, arduous process like convention of States that has little chance of achieving the exact amendments desired, conservatives can and must seek an alternative that can work. Considering the public’s outpouring of discontent with Congress and the many challengers to sitting incumbents, the opportunity to pass legislation restraining the courts is ripe for the picking. Continue reading

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Media Repression on the Question of What is a “natural born Citizen”?

Very clearly there is a distinction between a “natural born Citizen” and a naturalized citizen—they are not the same. Consistently, the notion of natural born Citizens implied that both parents would need to be citizens of the same country in order for their child to inherit the citizenship through natural law. More importantly, the father, leading the wife’s citizenship and identity meant that their child would perpetuate the loyalties and identity of the model citizen to uphold the Republic envisioned by the constitutional Framers. Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, Constitution, News and Analysis, Sovereignty Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

American Jeremiah: The Legacy of Justice Antonin Scalia

There seems to have been a sort of cosmic symmetry in Scalia’s passing away as he did following such faithful labors. He left us quietly, in his sleep, out on a secluded resort in west Texas whose main attractions were hiking and stargazing. Amidst this spectacular creation, Scalia left his country and world to gain his reward for giving voice to truths that will always be consulted whenever a nation finds itself, as we do, staring into the abyss. Continue reading

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In Obergefell, Did SCOTUS Create Non-Existent Constitutional Liberties?

Additionally, Chief Justice John Roberts makes the point in his dissent that “this Court is not a legislature. Whether same-sex marriage is a good idea should be of no concern to us. Under the Constitution, judges have power to say what the law is, not what it should be. The people who ratified the Constitution authorized courts to exercise ‘neither force nor will but merely judgment.’” Continue reading

Posted in Constitution, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Religious Freedom or Freedom From Religion

Religion has been the basis of law. Society’s moral guidelines have their origin in religion. How could one expect the very concept that gave birth to morality and withstood the test of thousands of years to now be abandoned for the sake of an experimental, relativistic view which does not necessitate but rather demands the eradication of any protection that does not fit the mold of 21st century bias? Continue reading

Posted in Constitution, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , |

Is religious liberty turning into anti-religious despotism in America?

From the disappearance of nativity scenes across the country to demanding the exclusion of the word “God” in the pledge of allegiance, to banning prayer in public schools, and removing plaques of the ten commandments from courthouses and schools around the nation…

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Posted in News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , , |

Nevada Cattle Rancher Standoff Far More Complex than Simple Lawbreaking

Cliven Bundy claims that he inherited “pre-emptive grazing rights’ on federal land because his ancestors kept cattle in the Virgin Valley since 1877, before the Department of the Interior was created. However, by continuing to graze his livestock on federal land for over 20 years after he stopped paying fees in 1993, Bundy may have acquired “prescriptive rights;”

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Posted in Congressional & Government Reform, Constitution, News and Analysis, Private Property Rights, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Would Impose Global Internet Censorship

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is being touted as a free trade agreement that will benefit the Pacific Rim countries, Canada, Mexico and the U.S. It is being called “one of the most significant international trade agreements since the creation of the World Trade Organization.” It standardizes 12 countries’ laws, rules and regulations in order to streamline trade. But the American public hardly knows anything about TPP. Secret meetings are being held by un-elected government trade representatives to discuss it. In place of Congress, corporate representatives are making decisions on everything related to trade. Corporate interests are essentially replacing American laws.

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Excluding the American People from Trade Negotiations

The government shutdown caused President Barack Obama to cancel his trip to the APEC (Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation) meeting in Bali, Indonesia this week. Secretary of State John Kerry led the delegation instead. Bali is one of the most opulent resort areas in the world. On the sidelines of the conference, there were discussions between Administration officials with their opposite numbers from the other 11 countries involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade negotiations.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Trade & Economics Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Sovereignty and Activist Judges

In its current term, the U.S. Supreme Court will weigh in on many crucial and emotionally charged issues affecting the nation. These range from voting rights to same-sex marriage to race-based college admissions policies. The intensity of these disputes was on full display on February 27 during the court’s oral argument on the Voting Rights Act. Unusually visceral questioning from Justices Antonin Scalia and Sonia Sotomayor, representing opposite ends of the court’s ideological spectrum, offered a glimpse into the raw conflicts coming to a boil before the high court.

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