Category: Foreign Policy

Iran Will Get Its Shi’ite Bomb

Tehran will not cease its efforts to develop its Shi’ite bomb. Until then, a review like the recent compliance certification of its nuclear activity is nothing more than window dressing designed to lull the gullible into a false sense of … Continue reading

Posted in China, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, India-Pakistan, Iran, Israel, News and Analysis, North Korea Tagged , , |

Will Trump Save the 2020 Census?

Under the Obama administration, the Arab-American Institute and other Arab-American organizations supported the Census Bureau’s effort to add a separate Middle East and North African (MENA) racial category to the upcoming 2020 Census. Democrats quietly but effectively sowed the seeds … Continue reading

Posted in Donald Trump, Foreign Policy, Immigration Issues, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, US Census Tagged , , , , , , |

China’s Belt and Road Initiative: Globalization as Imperialism

The Belt and Road Initiative is the vanguard for Beijing’s reach for global power. It may not work, given all the imponderables of a project on this scale, not to mention conflicting interests with nations along its route. But at … Continue reading

Posted in Belt and Road Initiativ, China, Foreign Policy, India-Pakistan, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

President Trump’s Visit to Poland: Cementing the U.S.-Poland Alliance and Endorsing the Three Seas Initiative

Not surprisingly, following President Trump’s visit to Warsaw, the Polish government declared that it is no longer concerned about the U.S. President’s perceived friendliness with Putin’s Russia. Although none of these facts are likely to affect Trump’s detractors and their … Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, Intermarium, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Three Seas Iniative, Trump Presidency, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , |

Back to the Future: Liberation Theology Rehabilitated

Liberation Theology began as a movement within the Latin American Catholic Church. The intellectual methodology of Liberation Theology relies heavily on Marxism. In its present form, it is a varied inter-denominational, international movement. The origin of the Latin American brand … Continue reading

Posted in Cuba, Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

President Trump’s Foreign Policy: The Case of Eastern Europe

“I am here today not just to visit an old ally, but to hold it up as an example for others who seek freedom and who wish to summon the courage and the will to defend our civilization.… Today, the … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , |

Economic Sanctions and Private Property Rights

Fifty-six years ago, President John F. Kennedy sent a reasonable message to the international community that governments choosing to expropriate the properties of U. S. citizens need to compensate them for their losses. Governments that choose to simply steal the … Continue reading

Posted in Cuba, Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Private Property Issues, Private Property Rights

Turkey, Christian Discrimination, and Church Pacifist Disarmament

In Christian churches throughout the world, special collections could gather funds to be used for the purchase of personal firearms and ammunition and the distribution of them to worthy people in need of defense for life, liberty, and property. This … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Islam, Islamic Terrorism, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom, Right to Keep and Bear Arms Tagged , , , , , |

Trump’s ‘Active Leadership’ Reverses Obama’s Cuba Policy

“To the Cuban government, I say: Put an end to the abuse of dissidents. Release the political prisoners. Stop jailing innocent people. Open yourselves to political and economic freedoms. Return the fugitives from American justice – including the cop-killer Joanne … Continue reading

Posted in Castro Communist Revolution, Cuba, Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Trump Presidency Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Trump’s New Foreign Policy of “Principled Realism”

The new U.S.-Cuba policy emphasizes our democratic values, but allows for negotiations responsive to the requirements of U.S. national interests. It is a policy of principled realism. The symbolism of a change to a policy that now embraces our values … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis

Trump Effect in Denmark: Reinvigorating Nationalism and National Defense

Trump could indirectly make “it easier for us to criticize politicians like Merkel in Germany and the EU. Trump will be able to change the ways we think and act, especially if he succeeds with his proposals of vetting immigrants, … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Refugee Policy Tagged , , , |

Out of Afghanistan?

To defeat the Islamists in Afghanistan, we should learn how to divide and rule. We must pursue a number of policies that may seem contradictory. First, we should strengthen the royalists, the republicans, and the nationalists not just at the … Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Islam, Islamic Terrorism, News and Analysis

UK General Election Analysis

While the left hungrily defends anything considered minority, they feel emboldened to attack what have hitherto been majority viewpoints in an increasingly fascistic manner. I don’t know what this new social religion is, nor do I really wish to sign … Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, Foreign Policy, Globalization, News and Analysis, The Radical Left, The Socialist Left Tagged , , , , , , , , |

THE GLOBAL WARMING-CLIMATE CHANGE SCAM: ONE OF THE GREAT SOVIET/RUSSIAN DECEPTIONS

The big event, as Natalie Grant called it, was a Moscow conference in January 1990. As Time magazine described it: “At a meeting of the Global Forum in Moscow in 1990, when he was still Soviet President, Gorbachev proposed an … Continue reading

Posted in Climate Change/, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, The Socialist Left Tagged , , , , , |

An Absolute Majority in the Service of the King

Macron had already announced during the campaign that if elected he would govern by decree – meaning to govern without the approval of Parliament – a practice allowed under the French Constitution, but unpopular to public opinion. Given his absolute … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , |

The Trump Effect in Germany: Where Strength and Skepticism Clash

For Robin Classen, the most important idea of Trump’s is “to end illegal immigration in the US and to deport illegal immigrants. If he will succeed with this idea, it will show the European nations that the immigration of the … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, NATO, News and Analysis, Trump Presidency

Trump Hosts Romania’s President, Klaus Iohannis

Iohannis’ White House visit was reassuring for those Eastern European NATO countries that feel threatened by Russia. For the Western European leaders, the message sent by President Trump was that they must meet the 2% of GDP annual payment for … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, NATO, News and Analysis, Russia, Trump Presidency Tagged , , , , |

Myths About Cuba

Raul is no Gorbachev or Deng Xiaoping and no friend of the United States, presiding over the worst periods of political repression and economic centralization in Cuba. Raul has been a loyal follower and cheerleader of Fidel’s anti-American policies and … Continue reading

Posted in Cuba, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Evaluating Trump’s First Trade Deal with China

There is nothing special in the “100-day Action Plan.” On balance, the consensus favors the opening of China to American business. It will, of course, depend on careful monitoring to insure that the door is swinging the right way. China … Continue reading

Posted in China, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Trade & Economics, Trade Issues Tagged , , , , , , |

The Dirty Red Secrets of May: The Left and Communism

This is the left: It returns to the dream of the true radicalism of a totalitarian leftist state. It occasionally deals with uncomfortable truths. Circles around them. And then it lapses back into an opium dream of Marxists sitting around … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Foreign Policy Issues, Liberty and Freedom, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, The Radical Left, The Socialist Left Tagged , , , , , , , |

Does Rise of Macron and Schulz Mean Return of “Third Way” Politics in Europe?

To reach that goal will require some measure of achievement by Macron in the early days of his presidency and for Schulz to emerge as chancellor after a nip-and-tuck race with incumbent Angela Merkel. Then Europe and the world will … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

All the Bad Options with North Korea

We should further step up our propaganda war via radio and social media against North Korea and its Chinese master. We should assist with an underground railroad to free North Korean slaves everywhere. Embolden the non-violent freedom fighter. And we … Continue reading

Posted in Asia Pacific, China, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , |

The Stalinist-style Assault Against White House Aide Sebastian Gorka

What is telling about the fake-news scandal and pearl-clutching about Sebastian Gorka and his Vitézi Rend medal is the timing. He has been teaching, lecturing, and commenting on Jihadism and other threats for a long time, but he was attacked … Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Trump Presidency

Trump’s Foreign Policy ‘Flip-Flops’: More Fake News

Trump did not campaign as an isolationist and thus cannot be charged with “flip flopping” because he is not acting like an isolationist in office. Both the original charge and its new twist are examples of “fake news” concocted by … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Trump Presidency Tagged , , , , , |

French Elections: Macron in ’17, Le Pen in ’22?

Should Macron stumble badly in office, then Le Pen in 2022 would be well-positioned at the natural opponent to Macron in her third bid for the presidency. By then, depending on the economic conditions in France and Europe her promises … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis

Trump Lets You Vote on Controversial 2020 Census Changes

The OMB’s decision on whether to implement Barack Hussein Obama’s plan to change the census to create a Middle Eastern-North African racial category and other government surveys is only part of the story. While the Obama Census Bureau has endorsed … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, Islamic Immigration, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Refugee Policy, Sovereignty, Trump's First 100 Days, Uncategorized Tagged , , , |

Belarus: Whose Provocation?

There will be no Maidan in Minsk. Hence, no need for regime change. There was further a self-serving message to the West: do not support the opposition to try to kick out “the last dictator of Europe” or else there … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , |

The Trump Administration’s Latin American Opportunity

The Trump administration, with its business acumen, intuitively understands that a Latin America that is entrepreneurial, prosperous, and free market oriented is in the national interest of the United States on multiple fronts: it limits the influence in the region … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

Eurocrats: Transparency vs. the Monet Method

Isn’t this obvious to everyone, including the Poles? One is afraid, however, that the refusal to recognize the reality of the European Union meted out to Poland its stinging slap on the face. Donald Tusk has been elected because his … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

The Peaceful Revolution is Complete

Perhaps the most assertive and British thing about Brexit was not the audacity to turn to a continent and say sorry and farewell, but the manner in which it was done. And that, I would argue, should give 65 million … Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

EU Institutions vs. Democracy

The Eurocrats no longer pretend that democratic legitimacy is necessary. It is enough that the club outvotes the people, who remain disenfranchised on the sidelines. In this manner, the Tusk affair sheds perfect light on the inner machinations of the … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

EU Tusk Affair: Poland Is No UK

The new generation in Poland, born and raised in freedom, is absolutely worth watching – it is they, contrary to the popular narrative, and not the retirees, who swayed the last electoral cycle: the young, who don’t watch traditional TV, … Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Brexit Happened for a Reason: EU Members Like Poland Ought to Reassess

Polish Prime Minister Beata Szydło wrote a curiously desperate letter of last resort to the European Union to prevent the re-election of her Eurocrat predecessor, Donald Tusk. She appealed to democracy and national sovereignty. This must have sounded like a … Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Sovereignty Tagged , , , , , , |

EU in the “Exit” Era: the Greek Case Renewed

The truth for Greece is simply that the status quo – globalization – has failed many and they do not want to be a part of a broken system anymore. They have come to believe that Grexit might be the … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , |

Moldova: Between Russia and the West

While Moscow is supporting European nationalism, the United States continues to embrace the process of globalization, multiculturalism and internationalism. A war for the hearts and minds of Europe is already ongoing. The new Trump administration will have to act very … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Turkey, EU Partner or Temporary Collaborator?

All things considered, Turkey may never become an EU member. At the same time, however, the partnership between the two is no less important. That Turkey should be incompatible with the requirements of the Union does not mean the two … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , |

The Return of Mahan, Mackinder, and Spykman

Russia and Germany are signed on to Beijing’s project. They are both cooperating as well as investing in the “One Belt, One Road” project (OBOR) announced in 2013. Does this portend the awakening of Mackinder’s powerful Heartland thesis? The possible … Continue reading

Posted in China, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The End of Palestine: Israel Has the Opportunity to Reclaim its Nation

Transnationalists are ideologically incapable of viewing a problem as unsolvable. Their faith in human progress through international law made it impossible for them to give up on the two-state solution. For two decades, pledging allegiance to the two-state solution and … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Islamic Terrorism, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Is Romania Approaching a Second Revolution?

It is hard to compare the current revolt with the 1989 revolution. In 1989 the West pursued and helped to bring about radical changes in Eastern Europe, probably in anticipation of the globalization process that followed. Now, the West wants … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Reviving the V4 alternative in Central Europe

Many Western Europeans ask: Why antagonize Moscow, thereby sacrificing comfort and relatively cheap natural gas, by defending second-class Europeans? But the answer is that, together, the V4 countries have 64 million inhabitants, which puts them in the same ranks as … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Intermarium, News and Analysis, Russia, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Did Nominating Little Ben “Sanders” Mortally Wound the French Socialist Party?

Benoit Hamon, the man opponents deride as “Little Ben,” rolled up 58 per cent of the vote in the PS (Socialist Party) over former Prime Minister Manuel Valls. For now, “Little Ben” has become France’s “Little Bernie Sanders.” What it … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

“Peace Through Strength” – the Realist and Reaganesque Essence of Trump’s Grand Strategy

Unlike his predecessor, and like President Reagan, President Trump undoubtedly believes in American exceptionalism and in standing behind our allies. Nevertheless, there is no question that he will pursue American national interests at the expense of universal or globalist visions … Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

The People’s Mujahedin of Iran: A Most Undesirable Partner

Quite a few Iranian exiles are worried about the pro-MEK stance of some influential people in the Trump camp. The Crown Prince of Iran, Reza Pahlavi, has reached out to Donald Trump to congratulate him on his victory and to … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Kill the Two State Solution

Like the old Monty Python bit, the two-state solution is a dead parrot. The shopkeepers of the press who keep trying to sell us its stiff unmoving body insist that the peace process is just pining for the Norwegian fjords … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Islamic Terrorism, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Seismic Political Shifts in the West

Nigel Farage, the former UKIP leader and the man credited with the success of Brexit stated recently about Merkel and Obama, the symbols of the current EU and U.S. ruling establishments, that they “simply can’t face up to the fact … Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

Clinton Inc.’s China Legacy, a Warning to Trump’s Presidency

Year of the Rat, sixteen years later, is still recommended to those who wish to understand how the Executive Branch under the Clintons and Gore through money, power and influence has historically exposed the Democrat political party, and allowed American … Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, China, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Fidel Castro, the Number One Enemy of Democratic Venezuela, is Dead

In Venezuela Fidel Castro is inextricably linked to Hugo Chavez and rejected by the majority of the population. For most Venezuelans, Chavez and Castro are both physically and politically dead. By Gustavo Coronel l December 6, 2016 When Fidel Castro … Continue reading

Posted in Cuba, Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , |

Beware of Greeks Bearing Gifts

May this complex situation in Europe, geographically so much closer to Russia, be a case in point? Russian modus operandi is radically different from the Western ideals of transparency and fair play. Open sources of influence alternate with semi-official or clandestine channels, just like in the case of email leaks during the presidential campaign in the U.S. Therefore, when a new American foreign policy is shaped and decisions are taken in 2017, one thing needs to be remembered: A gift needn’t be a token of friendship. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, NATO, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , |

Is Fillon the “French Thatcher,” Or France’s Kasich Battling the “Le Pen Trumpette?”

In the late 1970s, conservatives agreed that all but one of the major Western democracies had a right-of-center leader: the U.S. had Reagan, the U.K. Thatcher, and West Germany (before it was unified with the East) Franz-Josef Strauss of Bavaria, … Continue reading

Posted in European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Castro, Obama and the Prisoner’s Dilemma

Cuba, the non-cooperative betraying criminal, received the favorable treatment of being rewarded with U.S. diplomatic relations. And, the accommodatingly silent Obama administration ought to be harshly sentenced in the court of public opinion for its failure to act in the … Continue reading

Posted in Cuba, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , |

Fidel Castro Hated America

“Today, we offer condolences to Fidel Castro’s family, and our thoughts and prayers are with the Cuban people. In the days ahead, they will recall the past and also look to the future. As they do, the Cuban people must … Continue reading

Posted in Castro Communist Revolution, Cuba, Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Fidel Castro: Death of a Communist Dictator

“The world marks the passing of a brutal dictator who oppressed his own people for nearly six decades. Fidel Castro’s legacy is one of firing squads, theft, unimaginable suffering, poverty and the denial of fundamental human rights.” President-elect Donald J. … Continue reading

Posted in Castro Communist Revolution, Cuba, Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

“The Enemy of My Enemy is My Friend”: Obama, Syria, and Islamism

Apart from the loss of life and destruction, one of the tragedies of the Syraq war is that the Obama-led U.S. has pulled into the conflict on the side of the Sunni supremacists and Brotherhood-affiliates posing as freedom fighters. In this case, we must learn to think in terms of sober Realpolitik, and to acknowledge that ISIS toppling Assad is not in the U.S. interest. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , |

Post-Soviet hacking attack: A reminder of hostile cyber-security threats

America’s enemies continue to wage cyberwar against us and are, apparently, getting better at it. If our government is unwilling to fight back and shore up our cyber-defenses, the least it could do is not to make the job of hostile hackers based in Russia, China, the Islamic Republic of Iran, or any other unfriendly state any easier than it already is. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , |

Outfits and Trends of Russia’s Cyber StratCom

It would be misleading to posit that Russia’s propaganda works the same way that strategic messaging in democratic countries does or that the Kremlin’s strategic aim is to influence the public abroad directly. It may not always sway the masses, … Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia

Russia’s Pre-election, Cold War-Era Posturing in America’s Backyard: Cuba-Nicaragua-Venezuela

It is ironic that the U.S. victory in forcing Soviet land based missiles out of Cuba in 1962, will now be reversed with Russian nuclear submarines in Cuban waters. Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , |

Interview with Dr. Lee Edwards on ‘The Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation’ and the Dangers of Forgetting History

The Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation plans to launch the International Museum on Communism in Washington, DC in the fall of 2017, on the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution. By Georgiana Constantin | October 22, 2016 President George W. … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

Russia’s Deception and Denial Machine

The main narrative of post-Communism is that the Russian Federation is unique and, therefore, its system is neither of the West nor of the East. Instead, it is sui generis: a “sovereign democracy,” which in reality is a cover for … Continue reading

Posted in Defense Issues, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , |

“Austrian Donald Trump” Poised to Win Presidency in Delayed Race

>A just-completed poll by the Oesterreich newspaper among likely voters nationwide showed that if parliamentary elections were called, Hofer’s Freedom Party would emerge triumphant with 35 percent of the vote, followed by the two parties that now govern Austria in a “grand coalition:” the Social Democrats at 26 percent and the People’s (conservative) Party at 19 percent. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis

The Kerry-Putin Agreement and Syrian Ceasfire Collapse

Politics creates strange bedfellows, and in this one case, America’s interests seem to coincide with those of Russia, Iran, and Damascus. Going after ISIS with kid gloves means more terrorism and a continuation of the refugee crisis. Assad is a … Continue reading

Posted in European Union, Foreign Policy, Foreign Policy Issues, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Fixing a U.S. Diplomatic Gaffe: Protests in Romania and the Republic of Moldova

Historically, Moldovans are Romanians and their aspiration is to reunite with Romania. From a Romanian point of view, reunification is natural and imminent, although its timing may require some patience. It is feared, however, if they do not reunite with … Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , |

Like Trump and Brexit, AfD Showing in Germany Spells Bad Times for “Establishment”

With nearly 1 million refugees admitted to Germany last year alone and 220,000 asylum-seekers arriving since January 1 (according to Deutsche Welle News), the AfD is almost certain to be a major player in the 2017 national elections. Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

The Mosque in Bucharest: Interfaith Harmony or Political Strategy?

While the Turkish mosque, “mega” or not, coming to Bucharest might not prove to be the beginning of tumultuous relations between Christians and Muslims in the country, questions still remain as to why Romania has not even been offered the reciprocal courtesy of building an Orthodox church in Istanbul, if this is indeed to be viewed as establishing strong interfaith relations between the two countries. There is also the lingering issue of whether or not it would be foolish of Romanian authorities to ignore the possibility of a Muslim Brotherhood Islamization agenda, especially in light of the bloody jihadist attacks taking place throughout the West. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, Foreign Policy Issues, Immigration Issues, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom, Russia & Eurasia, United Nations Issues Tagged , , , , , , |

Moscow’s Synchronized Themes and Techniques

Learning Russia’s strategic communications themes and techniques is indispensable to countering them. Otherwise, our approach to the Kremlin’s narrative will continue to be one of confusion and surprise Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Boatlift to Chaos

FBI Director James B. Comey, who likely was ordered by higher-ups not to recommend indicting Hillary Clinton, recently warned of the dangers posed by migrants, “At some point, there is going to be a terrorist diaspora out of Syria like we’ve never seen before. Not all of the Islamic State killers are going to die on the battlefield.” Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Is Turkey Changing Sides?

Alert and ready to act, Vladimir Putin is courting Erdoğan, while outmaneuvered the Obama administration appears paralized and in denial. The question is: Will the next U.S. administration regain its sense of mission? Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , |

The “New Proletariat” – Melania Trump and left-wing hypocrisy on immigration

Since the mid-nineteenth century, Marxists have attempted to use the workers – the “proletariat” – and take advantage of their grievances to seize power. As time went by, however, workers increasingly rejected class warfare, prompting the embittered neo-Marxist left to seek new ersatz “proletariats” (such as immigrants and other minorities). Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, News and Analysis Tagged , , |

Even With “Boris and the Brexiters,” May’s Cabinet is Mixed Bag for the Right

“Brexit is Brexit,” declared May in spelling out her position to execute the will of the voters in wanting to leave the European Union. Certainly her tapping of Johnson, Fox, Davis and several others are strong signs she means it and will act accordingly. But whether May goes on to become another Margaret Thatcher is a saga that is yet to be written. Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

History Lessons for the Architects of the New US-Cuba Policy

The self-employment Cuba allows consists of work permits to provide services in 205 subsistence activities, such as repairing umbrellas and peeling fruits. Its participants are mostly individuals born after 1959 with no living memories of political freedoms. So, on what grounds do supporters of the new U.S. policy formulate change championed by the newly self-employed Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Private Property Rights Tagged , , |

DNC: The Neocons Come Home Behind The Democrats’ Hawkish Platform

Some Republicans are not unhappy to see them go. As Tom Pauken, former Republican State chairman of Texas, a backer of the non-interventionist view of the GOP, put it, “Let them go back to the party from whence they came.” Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , |

Turkey’s Presidential Putsch

One cannot help but think that the countermeasures were prepared well in advance. Either Erdoğan was prepared for the coup with extensive proscription lists or he staged a provocation himself so he could proceed with a presidential putsch. The government countermeasures appear too seamless, too well-thought out, and too professional. One way or another, the Turkish avatar of the Muslim Brotherhood is firmly in power. No wonder that Erdoğan referred to the military coup as “Allah-sent.” Perhaps he even helped Allah himself. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , |

Warsaw NATO Summit: One Step Forward, One Step Back

The true paradox of this summit is that the NATO policy moves a step forward and a step back, at the same time. While being truly insightful about the geopolitical threats outside NATO, the final summit document introduces solutions giving non-NATO institutions access to vulnerable information. Meanwhile, Europe is a continent steeped in history that has its own dynamics. It is good to remember that before any cooperation between NATO and EU institutions is tightened. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , |

The NATO Summit and Obama’s Much Ado Over a Polish Court

It is too bad President Obama apparently skipped his constitutional law classes while at Harvard. Firm grounding in the American constitutional tradition would help him understand the complexities of Poland’s struggle against the poisonous legacy of totalitarianism in its court system. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

Brexit: Charlemagne vs. ‘Rule Britannia!’

What Brexit makes clear is that the British want their country back. They believe their beloved and ingrained notion of ‘Britishness’ being threatened in Europe elicited reactions from those who have had enough of the ruling class dictating the terms of success, power, and control. Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Sovereignty Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Brexit Calls for U.S. to Reconsider Foreign Policy

With Germany economically dependent on the natural gas provisions from Russia, it is hard to expect any strong German support for NATO activities on the eastern flank. This is proven by the German reaction to the joint NATO war games, Anaconda 16, that are taking place in Eastern Europe. A NATO member, as it is, Germany denied the right of passage to the allied troops on their way to the games referring to them as “saber-rattling and warmongering.” The centers of power in Europe are shifting and Washington needs to choose its allies carefully. When we look at the map of Europe, it is quite clear that the new rampart of NATO is no longer Germany but Poland and the Baltic States. Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Sovereignty Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Rule Britannia, and Now What?

Will the spirit of decentralization descend onto central and eastern Europe? That probably won’t happen right away because the denizens of the post-Soviet zone are too scared of the Russians to leave the imaginary security blanket of the EU behind. They keep forgetting that it is not the EU, but NATO that defends them. And there is no NATO without American leadership. Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Sovereignty Tagged , , , , |

America, Globalization and Brexit

The British have just voted to leave the European Union in order to regain their national independence. For England, the vote marks the beginning of a return to common sense. It is a victory of the God-fearing people over the internationalists who advocate a border-less, God-less and very much a meaning-less new world order. We do need an orderly world, but it should be a world of free nations. It is high time for America to regain its sense of nation and sense of mission. Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Sovereignty Tagged , , , , , |

What if the Cuban Embargo and Travel Ban are Ended?

Over the past decades millions of Canadian, European and Latin American tourists have visited the island. Cuba is not more democratic today. If anything, Cuba is more totalitarian, with the state and its control apparatus having been strengthened as a result of the influx of tourist dollars. The travel ban and the embargo should be lifted as a result of negotiations between the U.S. and a Cuban government willing to provide meaningful and irreversible political and economic concessions or when there is a democratic government in place in the island. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , |

Western Civilization: Crisis of Confidence

We’re caught in an awful contradiction when we welcome into our midst members of a culture that accepts chattel slavery, the brutal subjugation of women, the murder of apostates, honor killings, murdering homosexuals, and killing those who insult their religion. Try to put yourself into the mind of a man who would murder his own daughter for being raped, daring to choose her own husband, or just getting uppity in public. Honor killings have come to Europe with Muslim immigrants, and lately to America. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Sovereignty, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , |

Russia’s Opposition to U.S. Missile Defense in Romania

Moscow’s disinformation campaign is a form of psychological warfare intended to influence Romanian public opinion and ultimately government policy. Such PSYOPS are targeted squarely at Romania’s membership in NATO and the European Union, intertwining the factual with the fabricated, hoping to cause great anxiety among the populace. The narrative goes something like this: The West won the Cold War with the sacrifices of the East European patriots and nationalists. The God-fearing nationalists, however, were excluded from sharing in the fruits of the victory. Instead, the Godless internationalists are preferred by America and the West. In this way, Russia is trying now to turn the tables and attract those who perceive themselves abandoned by the West. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Obama and Ho Chi Minh: Defending Communist Terror and Demeaning American Sacrifices

Obama’s trip to Vietnam is not a mere strategic journey, but yet another opportunity for him to remind us that the left has not repented or recanted of its solidarity and support for Communist terror, whether in Cuba, in Vietnam or anywhere else. It still sees every Communist dictator as a role model worth emulating and every Communist mass grave as the price that must be paid for a better world. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Southeast Asia Tagged , , , , |

From “Hitler’s Grandson” To “Austrian Trump”— “Populist-Nationalism” Now Poised For Biggest Triumph in Austria

Wodak attributes Hofer’s never-anticipated success in the first round of presidential voting to the 90,000 migrants who have been seeking asylum in Austria since last summer. What the Freedom Party has long derided as their country’s “welcoming culture” has led to its current immigration crisis and its slow rise in unemployment, Hofer supporters charge. Hofer’s slogan – “Putting Austria First” — clearly resonated with voters. And Hofer—an engineer, 41 years old, and a father of four — is less Jorg Haider than he is Donald Trump. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, News and Analysis, Sovereignty Tagged , , , , |

Islam is Colonialism, Palestine is Colonialism

There are Muslims in Israel for the same reason that there are Muslims in India. They are the remnants of a Muslim colonial regime that displaced and oppressed the indigenous non-Muslim population. The Muslim conquests and invasions are well-documented. The Muslim settlements fit every historical template of colonialism complete with importing a foreign population and social system that was imposed on the native population. Until they began losing wars to the indigenous Jewish population, the Muslim settlers were not ashamed of their colonial past, they gloried in it. Their historical legacy was based on seizing indigenous sites, appropriating them and renaming them after the new conquerors. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

A Little Publicized Meeting Took Place in Romania

The atmosphere of the Siania, Romania meeting was festive, and the event was apparently well-orchestrated. However, the main topic of the conference was both anti-West and anti-European Union. In her speech, for example, Marine Le Pen assured Romania that the country would be better off if it left the EU, which she described as ‘a drifting ship without a compass,’ and ‘a total failure.’ Le Pen questioned the EU’s future, calling it ‘a threat to its inhabitants.’ Instead, she proposed a Union ‘from the Atlantic to the Ural Mountains’… a Europe that would also include Russia. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Father Daniel Berrigan: May His Soul Rest in Peace

Fr. Dan Berrigan represented in a dramatic way the transformation of the Jesuit religious order from one which was known as a staunch defender of the Catholic faith (the Jesuits were called the “Soldiers of Christ”) to one in which “social justice” became the central theme of the Jesuit hierarchy. Daniel Berrigan simply took that modern vision of the Order to its logical extreme. Pope John Paul II was not a fan of the direction the Jesuit order had taken, nor of the liberation theologians who sought to fuse Christianity with Communism, or the social justice “warriors” like Dan Berrigan. Ironically, at the end of his life, Daniel Berrigan finally may have found a pope as an ally in his fellow Jesuit Pope Francis who seems to share many of Fr. Berrigan’s views on social justice issues, and even has Jeffrey Sachs as an advisor. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Southeast Asia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Europe’s Security Crisis: From Tolerance to Extremism

In light of all the chaos, one might say that the metaphoric battle of civilizations has reached European soil. But such a statement would be false. There is no battle, as a battle involves two or more sides actively engaged. The only active side in this story is the radicalized, anything but tolerant, threat of Islamic terror, which is ripping into the heart of Europe and putting people of all nations and religions in danger. The other side is the passive European continent, trying to cope with the philosophy of tolerance and to figure out what it may and may not say and do. Europe sleeps and extremists recruit. No, this is no battle. It is suicide. Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Political Correctness Tagged , , , , , , |

Trump’s Foreign Policy Speech: Did he Jump into Bed With Putin?

Despite the media buildup for the speech, it’s clear that on the matter of the US-Russian relationship Trump doesn’t represent a real change from the policies of the Obama/Hillary administration. A contest between Hillary and The Donald means the Russians emerge as the winners—no matter who wins. Another Russian reset is in the cards, compounding the American weakness that Trump says he wants to do something about. Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, China, Europe, Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Southeast Asia, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Vietnam War: Still Opposing the New Left at Home

I disagreed with President Lyndon Baines Johnson on many issues, but I respected him for his efforts to prevent a Communist takeover of South Vietnam. What would LBJ or Walt Rostow, the former LBJ national security advisor who was Dean of the LBJ School of Public Affairs for many years, have thought of a program on Vietnam so skewed to the Left? And, featuring a New Left leader whose followers infamously chanted: “Hey Hey LBJ, How Many Kids Did You Kill Today.” Continue reading

Posted in News and Analysis, Southeast Asia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Europe’s New Challenge: Wake Up or Break Apart!

The former West European communists of the fifties and sixties are posing as socialists these days and are largely in charge of the EU. The former communist parties of Eastern Europe changed their names and now pose as socialists. Together they act as comrades in arms and appear prone to build another ‘utopian Marxist society.’ What the Soviet Union did not achieve through sheer brutality is being achieved now with kid gloves by the new authorities in Brussels. As of now no East European country has decided to leave the EU, but the seeds of discontent have been sown. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Sovereignty Tagged , , , , , , , |

Castro’s American Victims

Obama would not have put in this much effort into aiding the Castro regime if the Communist dictatorship weren’t such an inspiration to the American left. Castro understood that for the bargain price of providing a refuge for left-wing terrorists, he would secure the undying loyalty of extremists like Obama. After Castro provided aid and comfort to left-wing American terrorists, the American left is finally in a position to bail out the Castros. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

Reversing the 1683 Siege of Vienna

On September 11 – the anniversary of the worst attack on America – in 1683, when the decisive stage of the battle of Vienna began over three-hundred years ago, the Muslim Ottoman siege was lifted and Islam was turned away from conquering more of Christian Europe. Today, Islam’s Hijrah is on the march and has returned to Europe, indeed, even invited in by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and seems about to reverse the Ottoman setback at Vienna during the late 17th Century, a third of a millennia ago. But, this time, there may not be a Polish King like Jan III Sobieski to save Germany. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Investors “With” Cuba, Beware!

In Cuba, foreign investors must partner with the Cuban government. The Cuban government expects foreign investments to generate revenue for the state on its terms. If the venture fails to meet the expectations of the state, the government may arbitrarily terminate the agreements and seek another naive investor for the project and there is no independent judicial system to adjudicate any investor claims. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , |

Christian Slaves, Muslim Masters

Without the multicultural demographic and ideological context, the holy warriors of the Caliphate would stand out like proverbial sore thumbs in the Western world. Currently, they enjoy a perfect environment. They will not let up until Dar al Islam dominates the world. Or at least they will keep trying. The West should oppose that.                                                                                                                     
Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Homepage Column One Row Two, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Boris Johnson: Brussels, Brexit and the Uncertain Future of the EU

“Let’s suppose somebody came to us all today, 2016, and said, bonjour, or guten tag, or ciao, we’ve got this brilliant idea for a new project to take all these higgledy-piggledy nations and turn them into a single political unit with a single currency and gradually moving, actually ever more rapidly, towards a single system of government, and you Brits will have to sign up for virtually all of it except the single currency. They would then be told that they would have to give up the right to make their own laws, pay for membership and have no border control. That’s the offer they make to us – a club that wastes our money massively, that subverts democracy in this country, takes away people’s power to elect the people who take the decisions, reduces the competitiveness of the European economy, and all for no real economic benefit. Why would we join such a club today? Why would we join such a woefully unreformed Europe? Would anybody in their right mind join the EU as it is today? I don’t think so.” – Boris Johnson Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Trade & Economics Tagged , , , , , , , , |

President Obama’s Visit to “Perfidious Cuba”

Fidel Castro has repeatedly sought to deceitfully assuage the international community, as evidenced by excerpts from his 1959 speeches. Three years later, in December 1961 Castro finally admitted, “I am a Marxist-Leninist and shall be one until the end of my life.” The following year, Castro urged the Soviet Union to launch a preemptive nuclear attack on the United States, with missiles from Cuba. President Obama is cavalier in dismissing history noting that “I am not interested in having battles that started before I was born.” Continue reading

Posted in Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , |

Squeezing the Buffer Zone between NATO and Russia

According to confidential sources leaked to the media, Russia is currently consolidating its military forces in Transdniestria. The Bucharest TV station Realitatea announced that Russia modernized, militarized, and expanded the Tiraspol Airport. Tiraspol is the capital of this republic. The landing strip of the airport was lengthened to 2,500 meters to accommodate big military planes while many new military barracks were built in the area. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , |

Where is China in the Presidential Campaign?

The public needs to understand the larger strategic context of the 2016 presidential campaign, but is not getting enough information on the stump about the most important duty of the next president; keeping the United States the preeminent power in the world system as China (and Russia) mount new challenges. Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, China, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Was March 13 The Start of Germany‘s “Trump Phenomenon?”

In many ways, the “AfD phenomenon” is increasingly likened to that of the “Trump Phenomenon” in the United States. Lacking a charismatic leader in the mold of Donald Trump, the AfD has nonetheless electrified voters with its hard-line on immigration and its persona as the movement opposed to the political “establishment.” According to Martin Klingst of Die Zeit, “The United Nations Human Rights Council says that there are already about 200,000 refugees waiting in Libya to cross the Mediterranean to Italy again and that more and more refugees will choose this dangerous route once the Balkan route is closed.” Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

NATO Centres of Excellence: A Security Threat?

It is essential for the American public to understand that post-Soviet countries still struggle with their past. Their new military or civilian structures may be filled with people whose allegiance is unclear. Those dubious connections may pose a serious security threat to the entire NATO structure. This existential threat needs to be properly understood and taken into account when evaluating the actions of the newly elected Polish government and the radical changes it introduces. Those changes have justification that can be easily investigated. However, they require thorough and fair media reporting, including a better understanding of the reality in post-Soviet countries. Otherwise, we run the risk of NATO infiltration by foreign intelligence services. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , |

“Brexit,” the British Exit from the EU, Campaign Heats Up

It is clear, though, that both sides have numerous supporters and the campaign will be vigorous. The voting to remain in the EU will be a vote against the risks to economic prosperity. Those voting for Brexit will be supporting Britain’s independence from Europe, primarily rejecting the tight control from Brussels. By virtue of the Brexit referendum, the nature of the European project will have been irrevocably altered, with “no return to the status quo ante.” Whatever the result on June 23, Brexit is going to be a campaign to remember. Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Sovereignty Tagged , , , , , |

The Cologne Attacks: A Look at Europe’s Future

This reality has become more dangerous for both refugees and EU citizens. Neither party has any security or cultural stability anymore. And, when equilibrium is challenged, a struggle for survival ensues. It might already be too late, yet even so, measures need to be taken to prevent a clash of civilizations. With the current state of affairs, such a conflict can have no winners. And, if the situation stays as it is, Western European culture, as we know it, will have no future. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , |

The Distance between East and West

The core of the problem is that some of the minorities hold the belief that Western women are sexually loose and are easy to seduce. This way of thinking was expressed by a former Muslim Mufti of Australia, Sheik Tag El Din Al Helaly. Al Helaly once said that women who don’t wear the head scarf, hijab, become like uncovered meat and bring upon themselves the consequences of being attacked. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Conservatism Isn’t Dead

A small government, hard power, anti-crime, nationalist and traditionalist conservatism can succeed. It has succeeded in this election, insofar as the leading candidates have adopted it, with varying degrees of sincerity. If conservatism is to be relevant, it is going … Continue reading

Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Trade & Economics Tagged , , , , , , |

Muslim Immigration is What ISIS Wants

ISIS can’t defeat us with terror attacks. The only hope for an enduring Islamic victory over America is through the rise of domestic groups that pledge allegiance to the Caliphate. ISIS can’t invade America. It has to be invited in. That’s what our immigration policy does. Trump isn’t a threat to national security. Muslim immigration is. Muslim immigration is the Islamic State’s only hope for victory over America. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

Is Turkey a Reliable NATO Ally?

Entrusted with NATO secrets and called upon to help, if the situation should warrant, Turkey’s current trajectory might, in fact, transform its trusted ally status into something completely different, something which might necessitate a rethinking of NATO’s strategy altogether, something which, in the end, might not even be called an ally. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Rhodesia: 50 Years Later

Robert Mugabe’s “liberation” group – Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU) became the chief terrorist organization in Rhodesia supported by the Communist Chinese and was handed power in former Rhodesia – now Zimbabwe – by the duplicitous British Labour government and the feckless Democrat administration of President Jimmy Carter. Rhodesia’s Prime Minister, Ian Smith, summed it up best by declaring, “We were never beaten by our enemies, we were betrayed by our friends.” Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, United Nations Tagged , , , , , |

Extinguishing Christianity from the Middle East

It is clear that the European refugee crisis is bringing to the surface inherent problems such as the difficulty of tracking migration and dealing with transnational crimes across open borders. It also raises the issue of the limitation of state sovereignty and the centralization of power. Arguably, the EU is unable to meet the needs of its culturally, politically and economically diverse nations. Such issues might prove a risk to EU unity. Post-Paris, it is obvious now the Middle East’s strife is no longer its own. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , |

The Death of Europe: Is Paris the New Normal?

The European values that require Europe to commit suicide are about ideology, not language, culture or nationhood. But the incoming migrants don’t share that ideology. They have their own Islamic values. The Muslim migrants who are meant to be the retirement plan for an aging Europe are supposed to keep its ramshackle collection of economic policies, its welfare states and social programs rolling along. But they’re more like a final solution. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Merkel’s Muslim Invasion

The Turkish solution still requires Europe to take in another 500,000 Muslims from Turkey in exchange for its tyrannical Islamist ruler agreeing to secure its borders. This means outsourcing European border security to a hostile Muslim country whose ruler dreams of reviving the Ottoman Empire and boasted, “The mosques are our barracks, minarets our bayonets, domes our helmets, the believers our soldiers.” That’s the sort of man that Europe will be turning over its security to. Meanwhile those 500,000 Muslims will also have to be “shared” all across Europe. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

Ushering in Poland’s Reagan Democrats

The leaders and followers of the populist conservative Law and Justice Party (PiS) consider a symbolic litmus test of international relations the previous center-left government’s egregious manhandling of the Smolensk Polish presidential plane crash in April 2010. They reject the echo-chamber consent of Warsaw’s incumbent liberal regime for Moscow’s ukaze that no foul play was involved in the plane disaster that killed Poland’s president, Lech Kaczyński. They would like an international investigation. This seems to be non-negotiable because the deceased president’s twin brother Jarosław Kaczyński is the head of PiS. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

Russia in Syria Reminds us of Soviet Actions in Cuba

Russian/Iranian actions in Syria represent a major gamble based on the perception of American weakness. An initial strong and swift response now will prevent the need for a riskier response in the future. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , |

Consequences of Obama’s New Cuba Policy

The Castro regime is re-asserting its close relationship with and allegiance to Cuba’s old allies, Russia, Iran and Venezuela. Agreements between Castro and Putin call for more visits by Russian navy and air force to Cuba. Raul Castro continues to support Iran’s nuclear ambitions as well as to maintain his commitment to the survival of the Maduro regime in Venezuela. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Exodus: The ‘March for Berlin’ and the Future of Democracy in Europe

There is legitimate concern over the possibility of sowing the seeds for a majority Muslim Europe. The fact that the continent has been and is still predominantly Christian, is not what ultimately draws apprehension. The truth is that, even if the majority Muslim Europe prediction does not become a reality by 2050, as some have estimated it will, if migration keeps going at this rate, it will eventually become a fact, perhaps during the lifetime of the millennial generation’s children. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , |

Cyber Statecraft: Developing a Strategy for Cybersecurity

Instead of waiting for the state to act, a bottom-up army of cyber warriors should be created. They should stand side-by-side with the marching National Guard and paramilitary organizations. If the government can’t protect us from cyber aggression by China, Russia, and others, including non-state agents – as evidenced most recently by the theft of over 20 million classified files by Beijing’s hackers – a U.S. cyber militia and a cyber tea party should rally to the rescue. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Obama’s Multicultural America and the Transformation of an Exceptional Nation

There is nothing wrong with human rights, except that it misses out God. It was during a God-fearing era when John Paul II was pope and Ronald Reagan was president, when American society combined spirituality with morality and brought communism to its knees. Today, we should heed President Reagan’s warning: “When we will forget that we are a nation subordinated to God, we will simply become a subordinated nation.” Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Foreign Policy Issues, Human Rights, News and Analysis, Political Correctness, Religious Freedom, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , |

The Rising Tide of Third World Refugees and the Plight of NATO’s Southeastern Flank

The Hungarians and others argue that for economic and cultural reasons they simply cannot accommodate the new comers. The Magyars refuse to succumb to the social engineering schemes of Brussels and prefer their country just the way it is. We should watch the European debate very carefully because it also concerns our own problems on America’s southern border. It is not Nazism to wish to protect the nation’s frontier and to uphold its cultural essence. Patriots defend their countries from all enemies: foreign and domestic. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , |

The Syrian Refugee Crisis is not America’s Problem

We are told that the Syrian refugees “stir the conscience” of the world; certainly not the Muslim world. The Saudis don’t want them. Jordan and Turkey have resentfully set up refugee camps without actually offering permanent legal status to them the way that Europe, Canada and America are expected to. Slovakia has announced that it will only take in Christian refugees and that’s the right thing to do. Christians are the real victims of this Muslim conflict. The vast majority of the refugees, many of whom aren’t even Syrians, aren’t. The rest of Europe should use Slovakia’s refugee policy as a model. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Beyond Europe’s Refugee Crisis: Testing the Resilience of the West

The EU’s recent history has allowed for easy migration over its nation’s borders. If, along with innocent war victims, the doors are also opened to those whose views pose a threat to the continent’s security, this is not a solution. It has been happening for years already, and, although some fear this migratory wave could be a well disguised Trojan horse, who is to say the gates of Troy have not already been forced open by steady and continuous integration of extremely differing worldviews? Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

The Current Refugee Crisis in Europe

Many people in Europe are asking what will happen if tens of millions of foreign refugees flood the continent? There are already a number of Muslim enclaves in Western Europe and most Muslims do not assimilate to the European culture. In fact, they challenge the European authorities by demanding the application of their own laws and customs. How much longer will Europe survive culturally and politically under such pressure? Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

Mega Mosque Project in Romania Sparks Controversy

The question of Islamic radicalism has become one often present in the minds of those who hear of similar ventures. Great care should be taken to ensure that implementing these endeavors for the sake of diversity, tolerance, or even out of ethnic and religious necessity does not suddenly transform into an excuse for preaching hate or radicalization. Many countries in Europe are now dealing with the threat of radical Islam and are consequently modifying their once extremely tolerant attitude. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , |

Greek Crisis, Russian Opportunity

Meanwhile, Putin has been rubbing his hands in glee at Europe’s misfortune. The Greek crisis offers a golden opportunity to subvert the West from within. It is also a welcome distraction diverting European (and even American) attention away from Moscow’s aggression against Ukraine and Putin’s plans to rebuild the Soviet empire. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , |

When Muslims Burn Jews Alive

Israelis who kill Muslims are considered pariahs. Muslims who burn Jews to death are glorified as heroes. And there are many such aspiring heroes, eager for a Palestinian Authority salary funded by American and European foreign aid and a “Get Out of Jail Free” card dispensed by Obama and Kerry. But the world is only outraged when Muslims die. It is not outraged when Muslims kill. When Muslims burn Jews or massacre Christians, it shrugs and moves on. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

Obama’s Nuclear “Deal” with Iran: A Historic Agreement, or an Epic Failure?

The “deal” seems to conform to a disconcerting pattern characterizing the Obama administration’s foreign policy of propping up anti-American Marxist or Islamist dictatorships. Thus, Obama has thrown a lifeline to and reestablished relations with communist-occupied Cuba, and his perplexing passivity vis-à-vis ISIS has helped that savage Jihadist tyranny survive and consolidate. Now, Team Obama has de facto shored up Khamenei’s regime and shielded it from international pressure and, especially, the threat of an airstrike by Israel (which does not possess the necessary bunker-buster bombs, which only the U.S. has, to destroy nuclear facilities embedded deeply in the mountains of Iran). Is this pattern merely a coincidence? Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

One of Last Living Holocaust Survivors Offers Enduring Advice

Martin Greenfield is a world-renowned White House and celebrity tailor. He has made suits for everyone from presidents Eisenhower to Obama, LeBron James to Paul Newman, and Frank Sinatra to the cast of The Great Gatsby. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

The Myth of Iran’s Peaceful Nuclear Program

If Iran were really serious about abandoning a drive for nuclear weapons, it would have shut down its nuclear program. Not because America or Europe demanded it, but because it made no economic sense. For a fraction of the money it spent on its nuclear ambitions ($100 billion to $500 billion), it could have overhauled its decaying electrical grid and actually cut costs. But this isn’t about electricity, it’s about nuclear bombs. The peaceful nuclear program is a hoax. The deal accepts the hoax. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

Did Obama Instruct the IRS to Target Pro-Israel Groups?

As a proxy for the Obama administration, the IRS has thus far successfully achieved their goal of blocking Z Street from educating Americans about the realities of Israel and the Middle East, while preventing them from exercising their First Amendment rights. Continue reading

Posted in Constitution, Foreign Policy, FreedomTax, Israel, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

Foreign Interests Found Funding Anti-Fracking Campaigns in America

There is strong evidence the Russian government is colluding with radical environmentalists in order to disrupt and stop other oil companies, like Chevron, from competing with its own natural gas provider, Gazprom. Russian oil interests connected to Putin are also funneling money to anti-fracking protesters in the U.S., using offshore money laundering schemes to disguise the funding sources. Continue reading

Posted in Energy Security, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , |

P5+1 Iran Deal Reduces American Influence

The United States and Iran are not morally equivalent; we do not share the same creed, vision for the world, or idea of liberty and justice. The U.S. initiates violence only to defend the lives of its citizens or liberate people from tyranny. Tehran’s theocracy initiates violence to further expand its reach with an end goal of establishing a global caliphate under the banner of radical Shia Islam. The U.S. is a liberating force, while the Islamic Republic of Iran is a conquering one. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia, United Nations Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Terror Immigration to America Must Stop

The United States of America faces a simple choice. We can fill our towns and cities with populations from terror zones and then act surprised when they kill us, or we can shut the doors on them. The Americans they murdered would be alive today if we had a pro-American immigration policy. We can end the bombings and the shootings. We can get rid of the TSA and the NSA. All we need is an immigration policy that puts the safety and security of Americans first. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Is Obama’s Census Bureau Balkanizing America?

The Israeli category is more controversial with some in the Israeli-American community. In Jewish population studies, most American Jews say they are Jewish by religion. Race and ethnicity have a complicated, terrible history for Jews, and American Jewish organizations were among those opposed to census questions about religion in the past reflecting their concerns related to the Nuremberg laws. Germany’s Nazi government used information from its own census to track down Jews. Continue reading

Posted in Immigration & Border Security, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

New Russian Maneuvers

Speaking at a recent Kremlin meeting, Russian President Vladimir Putin vowed to modernize Russia’s military forces and threatened with grave consequences any aggression against Russia. NATO did not blink. Announcing that a U.S. Marine Corps unit will soon be stationed in Bulgaria, General Norman Cooling declared to the Associated Press that “it is certainly our intent to convince the Russians and Mr. Putin to refrain from aggression and return to the community of peaceful nations.” Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , |

Waiting for Russia’s Next Move in Southeast Europe

Today’s Russia is still looking over its western borders and is luring some European countries. Greece, for example, is strongly dissatisfied with the European Union and went to Moscow for assistance. Serbia has just been visited by Russia’s foreign minister and is inclined toward Russia. Macedonia is following suit. Hungary is upset with the EU policies and is now befriending Moscow. Slovakia is tilting toward Russia, while the Czech Republic is caught between East and West. Only Poland, Romania, and the Baltic states are standing fast by NATO and America. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Ukraine and Crimea Tagged , , , , , , , |

It Takes a Good Guy with a Gun to Defend Freedom of Speech

We can either live in a paranoid politically correct world frantically trying not to offend the Hitlers and Mohammeds, and blaming their victims when they kill, or we can be freemen and women who have chosen to take the power to defend our rights into our own hands. While a thousand organizations use the Holocaust as a platform for speeches about tolerance, Children of Jewish Holocaust Survivors is conducting firearms training. Continue reading

Posted in Constitution, Foreign Policy, Human Rights, Israel, News and Analysis, Political Correctness, Sovereignty, United Nations Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Torries and Scottish Nationalists Rout Opponents in UK General Election

Though Labour and the LibDems have often worked well with the SNP inside Scottish politics, when it came to deciding the fate of the Union, Labour and the LibDems joined the right-wing in advocating for preservation of the Union, which may have cost them dearly. Now that the union is preserved, they have been effectively “punished” for their position on Scottish independence. The LibDems also got a shellacking by losing 47 seats and holding on to a mere eight, with party leader Nick Clegg resigning his post. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , |

Obama Administration Takes First Steps for New, Largely Muslim, Middle East-North Africa Census Category

According to the Pew Research Center, “Census data are vital to determining everything from how congressional districts are drawn, which local governments are required to provide foreign language ballots in elections, $400 billion in federal aid programs and enforcement of civil rights laws.” As Rashad al-Dabbagh of the Network of Arab-American Professionals, Democrat activist and former member of the Obama administration at the Census Bureau states bluntly, the “census numbers are critical for another reason: political power.” Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Sovereignty Tagged , , , |

Gad and Arshad: A tale of two young men from two different worlds

What would happen if Gad and Arshad switched places? If Gad, the Coptic Christian, were to live and work in London, while Arshad, the Pakistani Muslim man, were to live and work in Upper Egypt? The question arises, would both experience the same problems and rewards as they do today? My answer is that they clearly would not, since it is the community with its values and ideals that makes all the difference. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

The Slow and Painful End of Communism: A Look Back, 25 Years Later

In Romania today, the people have gained democracy but they have yet to enjoy the benefits of what a system constructed on freedom can bring. As much as the country has changed, it is still struggling to pick up the economic, political and social remnants of communism in order that it may discard them once and for all.

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Communist Cuba’s Alliance with the Islamic Republic of Iran

Tehran’s and Havana’s shared interest in Venezuela is another source of potential concern to the West. Of strategic significance is the possibility that Iranian scientists are enriching uranium in Venezuela for shipment to Iran. Venezuelan sources have confirmed this possibility. Foreign intelligence services consulted by the author acknowledged these rumors but are unable to confirm them. If confirmed, these actions would violate UN sanctions as well as U.S. security measures. Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Israel’s Leftist Losers

The only hope for the leftist dream in Israel is to unite with their Socialist comrades in the PLO and build a bi-national state using Muslim demographics to counter the demographic growth of Middle Eastern and Ultra-Orthodox Jews. Israel will become Lebanon.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Texas Senator Ted Cruz Announces for President – Appeals to Christian and Conservative Values

On Monday, March 23rd, I had the pleasure of taking part in another Liberty University (LU) convocation. During this event, Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz announced his candidacy for president of the United States.

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Posted in 2016 Presidential Campaign, Common Core, Constitution, Education, Energy Issues, Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, News and Analysis, Taxation Tagged , , , , , |

Another Castro in the Wings

In January, Alejandro Castro Espin also traveled, with Raul, to Costa Rica for a conclave of Latin American and Caribbean leaders, presumably interacting with many of them. A month later he led a Cuban delegation to Moscow where he signed a joint defense agreement. Married in the mid-1980s, he honeymooned in Leningrad around the time of Mikhail Gorbachev’s ascent to power.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , |

Moscow’s ‘Spetznatz Day’ is Everyday: Conspiracy, Assassination, and Disinformation

Nemtsov was shot right outside of the Kremlin, a very secure place. Further, he often complained about his FSB tail, a surveillance squad, which shadowed him. Why didn’t they jump to the rescue? Also, a snow plow inched slowly behind the strolling couple, obscuring security cameras.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , |

Russia’s “besieged Kremlin” mentality: Déjà vu all over again

The main objective of the Putin propaganda machine’s “America wants to dismember Russia and overthrow her government” line is obvious: to turn the tables by turning the victims into aggressors and the invaders into victims.

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The Iran-Cuba-Venezuela Nexus and the Castro Regime’s Continuous Support for Terrorism

In an attempt to obtain unilateral concession from the U.S., General Raul Castro’s regime has toned down some of the violent anti-U.S. propaganda of older brother Fidel. Yet, his commitments to and interrelationships with anti-American terrorist groups have not disappeared.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Latin America, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , |

Netanyahu’s warning to the West

Benjamin Netanyahu’s address was not only a warning but also a breath of fresh air. The Israeli leader is not afraid to recognize the evil of Islamism, unlike the Obama administration, which is unable to break with the warped post-modernist relativism that characterizes the radical left.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

A Revisionist Muslim History of America

The deceits of Peter Manseau and the New York Times, which never bothers fact checking even the wildest Muslim claims, are in their own way every bit as dishonest as Turkish President Erdogan’s Cuban mosque. The difference is that they have the protective coloration of academia and journalism.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Political Correctness Tagged , , , |

Venezuelan Armed Forces Establish State of Terror

Maduro’s regime, with the help of the Cubans, has turned Venezuela into a rogue state and the international community and democratic governments of the world should no longer delude themselves about its abusive, corrupt and illegitimate nature.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , |

Foreign Investors Face Corruption, Government Control of Property and Labor Issues in Cuba

All Cuban workers in the tourist industry or any industry that comes into contact with foreigners are carefully screened and selected by the government. Lighter skin workers and those loyal to the revolution are picked for hotel, resorts, and other tourist destinations.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Russia, NATO and the New Ukrainian Defense Policy

Ukraine is a struggling country caught between Russia and the European Union. Historically, the country has been associated for a long time with Moscow and its culture is split between the Russian-dominated East and the European-dominated West.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Ukraine and Crimea Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Fidel Castro’s Testament

Oddly, there is no mention in the letter of the release of the three convicted Cuban intelligence agents from American penitentiaries. The key figures of the large Cuban spy ring that operated in the United States had been heralded as national heroes by Fidel before his retirement.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , |

The Ghosts of Auschwitz in the Muslim World

It was easier to appease the Nazis. It is easier to appease the Muslim world. The Jews were not seen as a canary in the coalmine; instead, like the Czechs and then the Poles and then everyone else, they were an obstacle to making a deal with the devil. The ghosts of Auschwitz are still haunting Sudan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Gaza, Iraq, Iran and a hundred other places.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Human Rights, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Hungary Abroad

The Hungarian politician hopes that because Germany holds neither revisionist territorial designs nor any general historical animus against his nation, Hungary can serve as a useful and reliable geopolitical pawn for both Berlin and Moscow.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , |

Hungary at Home

According to his admirers, Prime Minister Orban’s third achievement is to restore and rehabilitate Hungary’s past, including its pre-war and war-time leader, Regent Admiral Miklos Horthy. It was Horthy who rushed troops and armored vehicles to the streets…

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Don’t Pack Your Suitcases

President Obama faces strong opposition in Congress to any unilateral concessions to the Castro brothers. A unified and powerful coalition of Republican and Democrat legislators will thwart his attempt to give too much and get little from the Castros.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

2015: A Much Darker Crystal Ball

The Middle East will remain a boiling cauldron as both al-Qaeda and ISIS continue their wars for territory and subjugation in Syria and Iraq, while targeting Saudi Arabia. Both groups are casting their eyes on other parts of the Middle East with Jordan and, ultimately, Saudi Arabia coming in their cross-hairs.

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Posted in China, Europe, Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Civic Values and the Ministry of Internal Affairs in post-communist Romania

In an era when post-communist systems are struggling under the weight of economic failures, dictatorial tendencies, and Russian military threats, Romania’s Ministry of Internal Affairs has set a standard for cultivation of civic values.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , |

Obama Throws Comrade Castro a Lifeline

Obama began his Castro speech with a lie, declaring, “The United States of America is changing its relationship with the people of Cuba.” The Cuban people have no relationship with the United States because they have no free elections and no say in how they are governed.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Russia’s Gift, Turkey’s Move

Moscow’s Vladimir Putin has resolved to send his energy to the European Union via Turkey. Ankara’s Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has accepted for his own geopolitical reasons and for the benefit of the neo-Ottomanist project, an attempt to re-create Turkic political, social, economic, and cultural dominion in its former imperial space, space some Western observers who have judged that the Islamic democracy has thus been merely assigned the inconsequential role of a transit area.

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Posted in Energy Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , |

Romanians’ take on the elections in Moldova: The front line of the EU-Russia struggle for supremacy

The recent Moldovan parliamentary elections have proven that the fight for power between Russia and the West is slowly but surely intensifying. While the Moldovan people’s votes seem to have inclined towards the pro-EU parties, the preference was only a minor one, with pro-Russian parties obtaining only slightly less votes than their opponents. “No party appears able to form a government, although, after a partial count, the three pro-EU parties do have a narrow lead over their pro-Moscow rivals,” Euro News reported on December 1, the day after the election.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , |

Elections in Moldova: A Country Torn Between Russia’s Threats and the Attraction of the West

Moldova is a small republic located in southeast Europe between Romania and Ukraine and is the poorest country on the continent. Historically, it is a former Romanian province annexed by the USSR in 1940 following the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact and transformed into a Soviet Republic. It became independent in 1991 shortly after Ukraine declared its independence. Except for good agricultural land, Moldova lacks any other important resources. For Russia, however, Moldova and Georgia in the Caucasus region are the “gates of the empire” and thus geopolitically very important.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

A New Romanian President

On November 16, at the second round of elections, Romania elected the first truly non-communist president since the fall of Ceausescu in 1989. Klaus Iohannis is a 55 year-old man who has been the mayor of the Transylvanian city of Sibiu since 2000. The election was hotly disputed and many voters were skeptical. They thought that the former communists, still in power, would not allow his victory. There were poll irregularities, some abuses, and many obstacles against the Romanians who work abroad and who vote constantly against the communists. Yet, this time the people put their foot down and voted for a true democracy.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall: A realist perspective

In the West, the “fall” of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 functions as a powerful symbol of the implosion of communism and the end of the Cold War; in Germany it is celebrated as the watershed initiating German reunification. The wall – which the East German communist propaganda apparatus called the “Anti-Fascist Protection Rampart” – was built by the Soviet puppet regime of the “German Democratic Republic” in 1961, primarily to halt the mass exodus of East Germans to the West. The wall was thus a reminder of the real nature of the communist bloc, which was essentially one giant Gulag – stretching from the heart of Europe all the way to the Sea of Japan – and that Marxist-Leninist regimes could not remain in power without terror, coercion, and intimidating border fortifications to prevent the slaves from “voting with their feet” and escaping from the “Socialist Paradise.”

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The Black Sea – New Battleground between Putin’s Russia and NATO

The Black Sea is located at a geo-strategic intersection between Europe and the oil-rich Middle East and between NATO and the Russian Federation. The annexation of Crimea by Russia and the ongoing conflict in eastern Ukraine add new significance to this disputed body of water. The issue of the Black Sea and the current Russo-Ukrainian conflict were discussed amply by the NATO leaders at their recent meetings.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Ukraine and Crimea Tagged , , , , , , , |

The Islamization of Jerusalem

Chaya Zissel Braun was murdered on her first trip back from the Western Wall where the indigenous Jewish population of Israel continues to pray in the shadow of the shrine established there by the Muslim conquerors from which the racist Muslim settlers rain down rocks on the Jewish worshipers.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, United Nations Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Daniel Hannan on Forging Anglosphere Identity

Across Europe and much of the industrialized world, in a growing reaction to globalization and socialism, many nations are beginning to question the current state of their historical identity and their future direction. With nations such as France, Greece and Hungary vibrantly moving toward nationalist and crypto-fascist identities that will begin to shape continental Europe’s future in the 21st Century, the gigantic unknown region of Western Civilization that has not yet dealt so seriously with this identity question are the Anglosphere nations, most specifically the United States.

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Posted in Constitution, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , |

The Kurds and the Question of ‘Kurdistan’

The Kurds are one of the most ancient peoples of the Middle East. They are of Indo-European origin and occupy a huge land area currently divided among Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria. Numbering close to 30 million people, they represent one of the largest Middle Eastern nationalities. Yet, they do not have their own country.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Why Obama Hates Netanyahu

Not only did Obama fail to sideline Israel, but he’s stuck dealing with Netanyahu. And no matter how much he may view Netanyahu as an Israeli Romney, he can’t quite openly treat him like Romney because there are plenty of Jewish Democrats who still haven’t realized his true feelings for Israel.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , |

The Obama Administration’s Mishandling of the Ebola Threat

As the Ebola outbreak reeks havoc around the world it also threatens the U.S. In the face of such a dangerous disease, it is only natural that American citizens should be afraid for their safety and would want to know what exactly the Obama administration is doing to keep them safe.

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Posted in Constitution, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Sovereignty, Transportation Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Implications of Ending the Cuban Embargo

Foreign investors cannot hire, fire, or pay Cuban workers directly. They must go through the government employment agency which selects the workers. Investors pay the Cuban government in dollars or euros and the government, in turn, pays the workers a meager 10% in Cuban pesos. Corruption is pervasive, undermining equity and respect for the rule of law.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Can the U.S. Provide Europe with Energy Security in the Face of Russian Aggression?

It appears conditions are right for the U.S. to export oil and gas in significant amounts to Europe. This would be not only economically favorable to the U.S. but politically very favorable to Europe, since it could largely replace in the medium term an unreliable source of energy supply from Russia by a much more reliable and friendly source, the United States.

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Posted in Energy Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia Tagged , , , , , |

Ukraine: What’s Next?

The parliament in Kyiv has just signed a bill granting autonomy to Lukhansk and Donetsk regions in the southeast of Ukraine as Russian President Vladimir Putin indicated was his wish. To sweeten the deal the Ukrainian legislature also voted to associate its nation with the European Union. This suggests a return to the traditional policy of subservience to Russia and cooperation with the West, a fence-straddling posture pursued by Kyiv since independence nearly 25 years ago. Putin got what he wanted, while the West remains rudderless under the Obama administration.

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The Cold War Museum at Vint Hill Farms

The end of the Cold War in 1991, an event often heralded as an ideological victory for anti-communists and conservatives, brought about numerous calls for the creation of official landmarks, museums, and monuments as commemoration of this juncture in not only U.S. history, but global history as well. From Berlin to California, independent groups and various governmental entities designated sites to enable present and future generations to remember the events that for almost half a century shaped the nature of global conflicts.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , |

Why the Free World Must Ban Political Islam

The purpose of this article is not to look at the religious aspect of Islamic doctrine but rather at the political system, built within the Islamic religion, which wants to impose Sharia law that claims to be the only true representation of the religion.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Coming Caliphate: ISIS Maps its Five-to-Ten Year Master Plan

In growing numbers, citizens of Western countries are leaving their homes to fight alongside jihadists of the Islamic State (IS), formerly known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). In the U.S., Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel stated in a recent CNN interview, “We are aware of over 100 U.S. citizens who have U.S. passports who are fighting in the Middle East with [ISIS] forces. There may be more; we don’t know.” Some cities in the United States are facing serious problems.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , , |

The Ukrainian Crisis: Theory vs. History

John J. Mearsheimer’s geopolitical game theory tells him that the West has provoked Russia into invading Ukraine. Moscow behaves rationally, you see, and Washington should have understood that before it expanded NATO eastward and stepped on the Kremlin’s toes. It is logical and legitimate to defend one’s sphere of interest. Why provoke Moscow?

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , |

Moderate Islam is our new religion

I have been searching for moderate Islam since September 11 and just like a lost sock in the dryer, it was in the last place I expected it to be.

There is no moderate Islam in the mosques or in Mecca. You won’t find it in the Koran or the Hadiths. If you want to find moderate Islam, browse the newspaper editorials after a terrorist attack or take a course on Islamic religion taught by a Unitarian Sociologist wearing fake native jewelry.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , |

Taiwan Stands for Democracy in China, and So Should We

On August 31, the National People’s Congress Standing Committee in Beijing laid down rules for the 2017 election of a chief executive for Hong Kong. The headline on which the Chinese Communist regime wanted the world to focus was the proclamation of “universal suffrage” for the vote. That sounded very democratic and out of character for the one-party dictatorship that rules the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The details, however, were very much in character.

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Posted in China, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Wake Up! Hamas is as Threatening as ISIS

Defenders of Hamas on the Left claim the terrorist organization merely wants to lift the blockade over Gaza, providing full freedom for the Palestinians to live in peace there. But even Hamas admits that is not enough.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Will NATO survive Russia’s aggressive challenge?

Viewed through the prism of Putin’s ultimate goal of collapsing NATO, the Kremlin had pursued the strategic goal of disintegrating NATO ever since its inception in 1949. Putin’s aggression against Ukraine is not only an attempt to re-subjugate a major ex-Soviet republic but is, simultaneously, also an experiment to test the West’s mettle.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

A Cuba Without Shackles

The United States’ strategy toward Cuba is the same it employed in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union during the Cold War. Cuba is an enemy state; it supports terrorism, traffics in humans disguised as humanitarian programs that send reluctant doctors, nurses and workers overseas.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , |

The United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) for Palestine Refugees, Supported by U.S. Taxpayers, is Hamas

The U.S. provided $130 million to UNRWA in 2013. UNRWA’s continued operations in Gaza would not be viable without American funding. Congressional investigations and condemnations have led nowhere. UNRWA has adopted neutrality policies, but it has refused to put up a firewall between it and Hamas. And it can’t, because it has become an arm of Hamas. UNRWA is on the front lines of the Hamas War in Gaza.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Uncategorized, United Nations Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

Steadfast in her Faith, Ibrahim has become a Worldwide Symbol of Christian Persecution

Ibrahim had been accused of having converted from Islam to Christianity and she was faulted for having married a Christian, for which she was charged with adultery, as the marriage to her husband, Daniel Wani, was considered invalid under the Islamic Sharia law of Sudan.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

More Questions about Cuban Spy Ana Belen Montes

Despite the importance of her case, some of the most tantalizing questions about her spying have never been publicly answered. Could the calamity of her treason have been avoided? What was learned about Cuban intelligence tradecraft? How was she discovered?

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , |

Yes, We Are the Noon (N) People

Where is America led by President Obama? You, Mr. President, have surrounded yourself with advisors loyal to the International Muslim Brotherhood. You have spent billions of American tax-payer dollars to support them. You spoke strongly on their behalf every time you felt that their rights were in jeopardy. Why can’t we see you offer the same support to the Christians of Mosul? Noon is the Arabic letter that represents…

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Homepage Column Two Row Two, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom, United Nations Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

The Destruction of Christian Memory in the Middle East

“Those families leaving from the checkpoints on the eastern side of the city were harassed and robbed of their possessions […] All families who fled on the last morning reported having money, belongings, jewelry, and even documents stolen from them. Women had crucifixes torn from their necks.” The Daily Beast

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Putin’s Ukraine Policy is Dividing Europe

Western insistence that Kyiv choose between the EU and Russia, claims Putin, is responsible for breaking up the country. Yet despite all odds, on June 27, Ukraine, Moldova and Georgia signed association agreements with the EU.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Ukraine and Crimea Tagged , , , , , , , |

Ukrainian-Russian tensions: A major risk for European energy security

“The question of exports to Russia falls under [EU sanctions] stage three. About when to trigger stage three, if there is more destabilization we have agreed, also myself bilaterally with the U.S. President, that if [Ukrainian] elections take place we won’t trigger stage three. We see elections have taken place successfully…”

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

How Diplomats, Reporters and Human Rights Activists Saved the Hamas Terrorists

The United Nations issued a unanimous resolution condemning Israel’s deportation of “civilians” and demanding that Israel immediately bring them back, or face sanctions. The United States voted for that resolution, along with three others condemning Israel.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Israel, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Strategic value of Poland and the ‘Intermarium’

The White House’s erratic, confused, and rudderless foreign policy endangers America’s Polish friend, and, indeed, other NATO members, putting Warsaw and the rest, in particular in Central and Eastern Europe, also known as the Intermarium, lands between the Black and Baltic seas, on a collision course vis-à-vis Berlin and Moscow. This is plainly obvious in the context of the Ukrainian crisis.

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Humor as a Political Weapon

With the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe, commentators and scholars initially focused on broader themes such as the moves by President Ronald Reagan and the subsequent Soviet recognition of the regime’s inability to stand up in the face of a determined, effective Western adversary.

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Hamas’ Atrocity: It’s Not the ‘Occupation’ — It’s Islam

The bodies of three murdered Israeli teenagers, 19-year-old Eyal with his guitar, 16-year-old Gilad who had just finished a scuba diving course and 16-year-old Naftali who liked to play basketball, will be met by the same ghastly parade of pallbearers who accompany every victim of terrorism.

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Sikorski’s Vulgar Musings and Obama’s Failed Foreign Policy

Radek Sikorski’s party, the governing Civic Platform, attacked the Kaczyński twins (Lech and Jaroslaw, president and prime minister of Poland in 2005, respectively) and their Law and Justice Party for their staunchly pro-American policies and assertiveness vis-à-vis Moscow, Berlin, and Brussels…

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Islam, Investing, and Indonesia: Why the World Is Watching July 9 Presidential Election

As the third-largest democracy in the world and home to the world’s largest Muslim population, Indonesia presents a fascinating and very significant political scenario. The Financial Times recently noted, “Indonesia is often singled out by Western leaders such as President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron as an example that Islam, democracy, and economic development can flourish together.”

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Myths about U.S. Policy toward Cuba

Like Eastern European economies under communism, Cuba’s economic disaster has to do with the system, not U.S. policy. Ending the embargo unilaterally will do little to change the Castro brothers’ anti-Americanism and their support for Venezuela, Iran, Russia, and for terrorist groups throughout the world.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis Tagged , , , |

Senator Cruz rallies against Christian persecution, calls for the release of Meriam Ibrahim from Sudan

Under Sudan’s Islamic Shari’a law, marriage to a Christian is considered invalid and a child who is considered Muslim cannot be raised by a Christian.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , |

Bergdahl’s Betrayal

Bowe Bergdahl’s action of disserting his post in the middle of the night in a very dangerous and hostile Afghan outpost certainly betrayed the rest of the soldiers in his unit.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , |

Defection is not Convergence

Buchanan dislikes the neocons, blaming them for maintaining an assertive foreign policy after the Cold War ended in victory. Apparently, the U.S should have folded its tent and retreated into isolationism, as it did after winning the other two world wars of the 20th century. Those strategic decisions left the country unprepared for the next round of conflict. History shows that all “post-war” periods become “interwar” periods.

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Religious Cleansing: The Mass Abduction of Nigerian School Girls

On May 13 the Washington-based Hudson Institute presented a panel titled ‘A Survivor’s Account of Boko Haram’s Religious Cleansing in Nigeria’ featuring Deborah Peters a teenage girl whose father, a pastor, and her brother were killed by the terrorist group in 2011. The Hudson panel discussion revealed that “Since 2011, Boko Haram attacks have killed over 1,000 Nigerian Christians, and bombed, torched, or otherwise destroyed scores of Christian churches, villages, and homes.”

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Will a Rogue General Undo Obama’s Regime Change in Libya?

It didn’t take Egypt very long to revert back to a military oligarchy with elections. That oligarchy wasn’t brought back by an armed coup in the dead of night, but by popular protests.

The Arab Spring was trumpeted by liberals as a new era in the history of the Middle East. But the Middle East is better at undoing history than the media is at writing it.

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Is Putin ‘the’ Big Winner in EuroElections?

Both the French National Front and the UK Independence Party were big winners with 26% (25 seats) and 29% (24 seats) respectively. “The people have spoken loud and clear,” exclaimed Marine Le Pen. “They no longer want to be led by those outside our borders, by EU commissioners and technocrats who are unelected. They want to be protected from globalization and take back the reins of their destiny,”… Continue reading

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A Comparative Look at the European and American Right

This problem of mass immigration, coupled with dangerously low European birth rates, has produced a “demographic time bomb.” Europeans are being replaced instead by a growing Third World population with a much higher birth rate. Karsten Lorentzen describes this problem … Continue reading

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Appeasement: From Munich to Crimea and Caracas

As in Munich, many observers of the Venezuelan situation felt dialogue was the correct route. The Pope asked for it. So did the U.S. Secretary of State, John Kerry and many Latin American political leaders. MUD, echoing Chamberlain, must have felt that they were interpreting correctly the desires of the people for peaceful co-existence and for attempting to change the policies of the regime, not changing the regime.

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Benghazi Scandal Worse than Watergate

Watergate was a political burglary gone wrong that was not authorized by the president, while Benghazi was an unacknowledged deadly terrorist attack resulting in multiple deaths. Both scandals involved U.S. presidential election campaigns, Nixon, of Watergate fame, during his 1972 reelection against Democratic candidate George McGovern.

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Posted in Constitution, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

John Kerry, Another False Messiah

Dear John,

Every few years a messiah arrives in Jerusalem, shakes hands, makes demands and promises to make peace in our time. Then when the whole thing blows up in his face, he throws up his hands and flies back blaming the ungrateful Jews for not embracing his vision.

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Will Modi be India’s “Scott Walker” or “Chris Christie”…. Or, its Vladimir Putin?

Narendra Modi, who has won three of the last five elections in Gujarat, now vows he will do for India what he has done for his state of 60 million – encourage investment and fight corruption. As to whether the “Modi Model” will work on a country or 1.3 billion in the same way it has on a state with 1/20 that many people remains to be seen.

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U.S. Economic Determinism in Dealing with Cuba

The views toward Cuba of many in the U.S. policy establishment have been influenced by a variety of assumptions. First and foremost, there is the strong belief that economic considerations could influence Cuban policy decisions and that an economically deteriorating situation would force the Castro brothers to move Cuba toward a market economy and eventually toward political reforms.

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Ukraine: American Illusions and Russian Delusions

To further intimidate Kyiv, Vladimir Jirinovsky, chief of Russia’s communist party and a member of parliament, reminded Ukraine that it has inherited lands belonging to its neighbors, including Romanian lands. And he alluded to the possible further dismemberment of Ukraine. While annexing Crimea, President Putin assured Kyiv that Moscow would react severely if Romania dares to make a territorial claim.

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Turkey, where individual freedom meets censorship in the age of social media

In his visit to Ankara, Turkey on Monday, German President Joachim Gauck talking to reporters was critical of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan for government moves to ban certain web sites. “Is it necessary to ban Twitter or YouTube?” he asked. “Does this really further democracy?”

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Putin’s Active Measures, Buchanan’s Grief

True enough the Moscovite leader has invoked God routinely. So did Stalin. In public the Georgian mass murderer played the God card whenever it suited him. Places of worship were forcibly closed. Most of them were destroyed. All religions were virtually banned and their followers were exterminated by the millions.

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Ukraine and U.S. Natural Gas Exports: Right Policy, Right Now

For perhaps the first time since the 2010 election inaugurated divided control of Capitol Hill, there was actual excitement about energy legislation as the House took up a bill to expedite the export of liquefied natural gas (LNG). It’s not that the House hasn’t passed dozens of bills to encourage domestic oil and gas production, or discipline extralegal rulemakings by the EPA – it surely has. Rather, it’s been the automatic DOA status of these measures in the Senate that’s made the movie seem old and predictable. Well, that may be changing.

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Conservatives Must Insure Capitalism Serves the Nation

The group National Foreign Trade Council has opposed all sanctions on Iran from the start of the nuclear crisis. Iran has oil money and NFTC members want to do business with the regime regardless of any other consideration.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, News and Analysis, Trade & Economics, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Is it Time to Revisit Putin’s Role in the Smolensk Crash?

After the Smolensk plane crash, the speed with which the disaster became – not unlike Benghazi – relegated to “yesterday’s news” was stunning. An uninformed observer might conclude that what happened at Smolensk was but a minor incident…

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Christian Persecution ‘Not’ the Center Point of Obama’s Vatican Meeting with Pope Francis

President Barack Obama’s meeting with His Holiness Pope Francis at the Vatican on March 27 revealed that the topic of Christian persecution, particularly in the Middle East, where it is most acute and is the deliberate target of fundamentalist Islamist militants, was not a White House priority.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Cuban Intelligence in Strategic Alliance with Iran against the United States

While one may argue that factors such as Iran’s limited military capabilities and sheer distance diminish any conventional concerns, one should expect that Tehran, in case of a U.S.-Iran conflict would launch an asymmetrical offensive against the U.S. and its European allies through surrogate terrorist states and paramilitary organizations, where Cuban intelligence would become an invaluable asset to Tehran.

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Putin’s military moves in Latin America

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said he is seeking to establish a military presence in Venezuela, Nicaragua and Cuba. Now with Obama’s weak response to Russia’s annexation of Crimea from Ukraine, it may act as a stimulus for Putin’s further imperialistic moves.

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The Islamic Assault on Nigeria, Christian Persecution and the Saudi Connection

Boko Haram’s Abul Qaja also claims the group is a spiritual follower of al-Qaeda and claims they have been training and getting funding from Saudi sources. “Al-Qaeda are our elder brothers,” said Qaja. “During the lesser Hajj [August 2011], our leaders travelled to Saudi Arabia and met al-Qaeda there. We enjoy financial and technical support from them. Anything we want from them we ask them.”

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Does Big Nationalist Showing in French Local Elections Spell Big Putin Bloc in EU Parliament?

Last month, Russia invited representatives from the European far-right parties to Crimea as observers of the referendum on whether the predominantly Russian-speaking state wanted to leave Ukraine to become part of Russia.

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The U.S. Congress Continues the Fight Against Christian Persecution

Offering a solution, Elliot Abrams testified before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Global Human Rights explaining it would be a good idea for the U.S. to consider economic sanctions on countries where Christians are persecuted.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , |

Ukraine: Operation Wave

During three long months of increasingly violent demonstrations in Ukraine some observers asked themselves a question about an allegedly imminent crack down. When? And how? One assumed that the government of Viktor Yanukovych, to maintain itself in power and to preserve its credibility, had to act.

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French Municipal Elections Could Shape Things To Come For Hollande, EU

Given the unpopularity of the Hollande government, the disarray of France’s center-right opposition, the rise of the National Front, and the European parliamentary elections in May, there are clearly going to be developments coming from the votes cast on March 23rd and the run-off…

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Cuban Strategy in Venezuela

Sunday, February 23rd Raul Castro set out the essence of Cuban policy toward the increasingly volatile situation in Venezuela. Speaking to the Cuban labor confederation he described it as “a complex crisis,” indicating considerable alarm in Havana about how Cuba’s vital economic and security interests might be affected.

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Revisiting the “Reset” and Russian Expansion into Crimea

Putin has every reason to think that the Ukraine crisis will pass as did the Georgia crisis. And President Xi Jinping in Beijing will be watching as well, calculating how far to push in Asia. What is being reset is the map of the world.

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American Cowboy Diplomacy is the Only Defense Against Commissar Diplomacy

Sarah Palin understood in 2008 what the school of foreign policy “realists” did not, that Georgia was not significant in isolation but as a prerequisite to the invasion of Ukraine and likewise Ukraine should be understood in the context of an imperial territorial ambition that stretches far beyond its borders.

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Ukraine: A New Battleground Between Russia and the West

Ukraine is the biggest East European country; it represents the real core of Eastern Europe; and it is currently a bone of contention between Moscow and the West. With an area almost as big as France, a population of 46 million people, with good agricultural land and huge industrial complexes, Ukraine is a country of utmost importance.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Sovereignty, Ukraine and Crimea, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Turmoil in post-Chavez Venezuela

For 15 years Venezuela has been in the grip of an authoritarian regime, first under the late Hugo Chavez and currently under his anointed successor, Nicolas Maduro. From the beginning, the regime developed a pathological political dependence on Fidel Castro’s Cuba, one which has made it possible for the Castro regime to actually dictate Venezuelan policy. On Thursday, February 20th, Members of Congress… Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America, News and Analysis, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Doing Business with Castro’s Cuba

The Castro regime, facing an acute financial crisis and the possible risk of losing their lucrative Venezuelan oil lifeline, is trying to woo foreign investors, including some Cuban-American businessmen. It has launched this charm offensive without a true opening, while arresting, beating and harassing hundreds of peaceful Cuban pro-democracy activists.

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Scarlett Johansson, SodaStream Episode, Expose Hypocrisy, Hostility of Anti-Israel Activists

Three weeks ago, SodaStream was just a specialty company making high-end, home-carbonation equipment and flavored syrups. Although they were publicly traded (NASDAQ: SODA), and their products were popular among enthusiasts, they weren’t quite a household name. Looking for publicity, they signed a deal with actress-model Scarlett Johansson to be their first ‘Global Brand Ambassador,’ and announced that she would appear in a Super Bowl commercial.

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Khartoum Meddling, Duplicity, Tribalism and the Uncertain Future of South Sudan

Although there is apparent peace in the recent civil struggle in South Sudan, the underlying causes of the civil conflict remain unsettled.

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Posted in Energy Security, Foreign Policy, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Get David Satter: Who’s more of a threat to the Kremlin, the journalist or the terrorist?

David Satter (who happens to be an acquaintance of mine) has just been expelled from the Russian Federation. David is no stranger to the masters of the Kremlin. He has accumulated a long track record of annoying them. Having been threatened with deportation as early as 1979 for “hooliganism,” Satter left the Soviet Union three years later under a cloud in 1982.

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Honduran election over, but legacy of 2009 constitutional ouster endures

Just two months after the presidential election in Honduras was held and President-elect Juan Orlando Hernandez prepares to take office today, it is clear that the Honduran people as well as the international community have accepted the outcome.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Egyptians say “Yes” to post-Morsi Constitution, and more, in national referendum

On the 14th and 15th of January, the people of Egypt voted overwhelmingly in a national referendum for a new Constitution to replace the pro-Muslim Brotherhood Constitution of 2012. The new 2014 Constitution was approved by an unprecedented majority of 98.1%, 19.1 million out of 20.6 million voted “yes”… Continue reading

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UK leaders sound alarm over persecution of Christians in the Middle East

The 2013 Christmas season brought with it the clarion call sounded by the Prince of Wales and a series of UK leaders over the dwindling population of Christians in the Middle East, where “Christianity was, literally, born.” Speaking at Clarence House in London, Prince Charles addressed religious leaders, following visits to both the Coptic Orthodox and the Syrian Orthodox Churches.

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2014: Gazing Through a Crystal Ball, Darkly

2014 opens with gathering storm clouds and the U.S. ship of state under the command of an administration pursuing increasingly dubious foreign policies and facing declining public approval. The chickens stirred up by the “Leading from behind” approach are coming home to roost, particularly in the Middle East with the White House tilt to Iran.

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Fighting for religious freedom: The plight of Saeed Abedini and America’s response

“I was devastated to learn that the [Obama] Administration didn’t even ask for my husband’s release when directly seated across the table from the leaders of the government that holds him captive.” Naghmeh Abedini

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The EU’s Vilnius Summit and the Ukraine Fiasco

A much anticipated summit was held in Vilnius, Lithuania (Nov. 28-29), to prepare the eastern expansion of the European Union. The big prize was to bring Ukraine closer to Europe. At the same time, three other smaller countries, Moldova, Georgia and Armenia, were expected to sign association agreements with the EU.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia, Ukraine and Crimea Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Egypt’s New Draft Constitution Raises Concerns Over Defining Islamic Sharia Law

A new Constitution for Egypt has just been drafted and sent to the interim president Adly Mansour for his approval before putting it to a popular referendum. A committee of fifty representing various factions of Egyptian society, as well as ten specialists in constitutional law, worked on the project that ultimately produced the final draft containing 247 articles. If approved, the 2013 Constitution would replace the 2012 Constitution known as the Brotherhood Pro- Islamic Constitution enacted during the rule of ousted President Mohammed Morsi (June 30, 2012 to July 3, 2013).

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Cuba’s Suspension of U.S. Consular Services

Cuba’s suspension of consular services in the U.S. may have little to do with finances and much to do with Gen. Raul Castro’s interest in slowing down visits by Cuban-Americans to the island.

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China’s New Air Defense Zone is a Sign of Much Larger Ambitions

On November 23, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) announced the establishment of an East China Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) and demanded that all aircraft entering or transiting the zone file flight plans with Beijing. China then deployed fighters to patrol the zone; threatening military action against anyone who did not acknowledge it’s authority in what is otherwise considered international…

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Will Kerry Keep U.S. Sanctions on Cuba?

In his November 18 speech at the Organization of American States, Secretary John Kerry failed to make a compelling case for keeping U.S. sanctions on Cuba. While correctly pointing out that the Monroe Doctrine is no longer valid, Secretary Kerry insisted that “people-to-people” travel, the visits by Americans under U.S. license to Cuba, is having an impact in penetrating the Communist system.

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Snowden Forever

This is not to cheer the defector but simply to point out that the phenomena undergirding the Edward Snowden case will continue to metastasize predictably, linger painfully, and haunt us into the foreseeable future. Yet, this awful affair affords us an opportunity to have a long, merciless look at the perpetrator, ourselves, and the damages wrought on the nation. Continue reading

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American tourists will not bring democracy to Cuba

There is no evidence to support the notion that engagement with a totalitarian state will bring about its demise. Only academic ideologues and some members of Congress interested in catering to the economic needs of their state’s constituencies cling to … Continue reading

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Interview with Mounir Bishay: The Christian-Muslim Fault Lines in Egypt and the Middle East

Christians in Egypt are facing hardships not only in practicing their religion, but also in living normal, peaceful lives. This has unfortunately been the case for centuries. News abounds with the tragic stories Copts live every day. And it appears that this region is going to keep offering the media sorrowful and terrible accounts to report on, as there doesn’t seem to be any hope of change, while the Obama…

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Saakashvili, Exit Right: Will Georgia’s New Leadership Tilt Toward Moscow?

Even before Ivanishvili assumed political power, parliament voted to shift many powers from the presidency itself and, in effect, gave Georgia a parliamentary form of government instead of a strong presidential system. More than a few Georgia-watchers speculate that this change was part of a master plan by Saakashvili to call the political shots as prime minister in the manner of Russia’s Putin between presidential stints. Continue reading

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Killing Castro: Code Name AMLASH

Fidel Castro knew that the CIA was trying to kill him. There was no doubt; his sources were reliable. “For three years,” he told investigators from the House of Representatives in 1978, “we had known there were plots against us.” The history of Kennedy era attempts against Castro’s life is well known. There were several plots and bizarre schemes, two featuring Mafia kingpins, ones involving incendiary cigars, an explosive sea shell, and a poisoned diving suit. But the most promising of the killing plans ripened in a Paris safe house fifty years ago last month.

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Ignorance is bliss … especially in the Smolensk case

Ridicule is probably one of the oldest tools in the arsenal of political warfare. Making fun of an opponent serves to both undermine his credibility, and even to provoke him into angrily over-reacting. One method to discredit one’s political enemies is to mock them as “conspiracy theorists,” thereby implying that the targeted group is paranoid and psychologically unbalanced. Such a tactic requires little to no intellectual effort and allows one to conveniently avoid addressing the other side’s arguments.

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Netanyahu to U.S. Jews: The time is now to “speak up” about Iran

Jerusalem, Israel – In a rousing speech to attendees at the annual General Assembly meeting of the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNAGA), Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told his audience Sunday evening that Iran was an “historical killer,” that cannot, under any circumstances, be allowed to have a nuclear weapon. The Jewish Federations of North America represent 153 Jewish communities in North America. Netanyahu pleaded with those in attendance to speak up now about Iran because time is running out to stop their nuclear program.

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Ramzan Kadyrov and the Chechen Political Landscape

In the 21st century, the pantheon of tyrants has reached proportions which are almost unimaginable by the standards of previous historical periods. It is not simply that there are so many in this era but, perhaps more notably, that today’s tyrants are both shameless and constantly in the public eye.

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OBAMA’S ENERGY POLICY: SLOWING GROWTH HERE AND ABROAD

As a professional staff member on the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations in 2011, I was able to visit several countries to check on how the U.S. Aid for International Development (USAID) agency was fulfilling its many missions. On the agency’s website is the statement, “Broad-based economic growth is essential to sustainable, long-term development. It creates the opportunities impoverished households need to raise their living standards, provides countries with the resources to expand access to basic services, and—most important of all—enables citizens to chart their own prosperous futures.” Absolutely true, and not just in “developing” parts of the Third World, but in all parts of the world as “development” is an ongoing process everywhere.

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The war in Syria: Building upon the sand?

In Syria, the endemic conflict that lays siege to Christianity, where it once stood as a partner of Assad’s strategic minority rule, consumes the region. At the advent of the Arab Spring, anti-government violence was ignited into a nationwide uprising that has not abated since 2011.

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Vladimir Putin Asserts Russia’s Regional Economic Power

Something strange is happening in the world this fall of Anno Domini 2013. The United States seems politically deadlocked. Europe is struggling both politically and economically and is not really functioning as a union. The Middle East has just stopped short of a new war. And Russia under the old and new President Vladimir Putin is reasserting itself as an international power.

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De Blasio: From the Synagogues of Nicaragua to the Synagogues of New York

The Democratic nominee for Mayor of New York City, the city with the largest Jewish population in the country, was a strong supporter of a Marxist regime that ethnically cleansed its Jewish population, conducting a reign of terror that included informants, arrests, expulsion and attacks on a synagogue. And he did this not before the truth about Nicaragua was known, but long after it was known.

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What “Merkel 3.0″ Means to Germany, U.S., and Europe

Politicians and pundits from Berlin to Washington are still reeling over the landslide win of German Chancellor Angela Merkel a week ago Sunday. Observers wonder what a third term and a new cast in her ruling coalition in the Bundestag (parliament) means for the strong-willed lady known as “Iron Angie,” “Mother Europe.”

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Congressman Steve Stockman: Justice Department cannot be involved in Benghazi investigation

WASHINGTON — “Having an independent investigation on Benghazi means not having the Justice Department interfering in any way” declared Congressman Steve Stockman (R-TX), in an exclusive interview with SFPPR News & Analysis. Stockman has joined a growing list of Republicans calling for an independent, bi-partisan Special Select Committee to investigate the remaining questions surrounding the terrorist attack of September 11, 2012 in Benghazi, Libya. He elaborated on his position saying “you cannot have people that may be involved in a cover-up also investigating that cover-up.”

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No Good Way in Syria’s Civil War

The United States has painted itself into a geopolitical corner over Syria. At the moment, Russia gloats, while China circles above, carrion-like, leaving America with no good moves. There is only lesser evil: in Syria, in the region, and on the global scene. Backing the Alawite-led Bashar al-Assad regime of the national socialist Baath Party is tantamount to restoring the hostile situation prior to the Arab Spring, including Iran’s nefarious influence in Lebanon with its proxy Hezbollah. Supporting the rebels means enabling the Sunnis in general, the Muslim Brotherhood and the al-Qaeda in particular. Make no mistake, the rebels do accept support from the royalist Gulf States, but it is not the sworn monarchists or military secularists doing battle against the Assad regime.

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Chechens: Sochi or Syria?

In June of 2013, Doku Umarov, who considers himself leader of the Caucasus Emirate and is regarded as Russia’s most recent version of Osama bin Laden, resurfaced after a long period of self-imposed obscurity. The main purpose of his short video statement, which appeared on YouTube, was to offer condolences to the families of Islamic insurgents who died in a series of unsuccessful operations. Because he had not been seen since November 2012, there was speculation that he was dead or, at a minimum, irrelevant as Russia prepared to host the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.

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World Summit on Counter-Terrorism

HERZLIYA, Israel – The 13th annual World Summit on Counter-Terrorism ran Sunday through Wednesday, September 8-11, and was hosted by the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya. Sponsored by the IDC’s International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT) founded in 1996 by Dr. Boaz Ganor, the Summit is now a must event for the growing counter-terrorism community. The Summit is held the week of 9/11 to commemorate the victims of the biggest terrorist atrocity ever to occur and marks the 12th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center in New York by Islamist terrorists.

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Where is Obama’s red line in Egypt?

In the aftermath of President Mohamed Morsi’s ouster in Cairo by the military on July 3, Christian shops have been marked with red graffiti just before being attacked, a reminder of the infamous time in biblical history when the Israelites had to mark their doors with the blood of lambs in order to be spared the wrath of God manifested through the Angel of Death. This time, Christian doors are marked in this way as a sign of condemnation and vengeance.

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Why German Vote This Month Matters

The irony about Germany’s national election September 22 is that there is far greater interest in the outcome in foreign capitals from Washington to Athens to Brussels than there is among voters in Berlin, Munich or anywhere in Germany. The reason for this “ho-hum” attitude among the German electorate about their election as well as the “can’t wait” attitude among the rest of the world is summarized in two words: Angela Merkel. Her CDU (right-of center) Party is leading comfortably in nearly all polls for Bundestag races (lower house of parliament) later this month.

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Obama’s Red Line: A Different Perspective

As I stood on the beautiful Mediterranean coast last Thursday, my calm was suddenly disrupted by the screeching sound of an Israeli jet fighter. Due to Israel’s miniscule size this is nothing unusual. It is virtually impossible for citizens and tourists to not encounter some aspect of the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) during the course of an ordinary day. Security is understandably tight but Thursday was different.

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Posted in Constitution, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Congressman Wolf: ‘Benghazi Four’ State Department Employees Still Being “Intimidated”

In spite of being allowed to return back to their positions, the ‘Benghazi Four’ are still being “intimidated” by the federal government according to Congressman Frank Wolf (R-Va.). “They should be allowed to speak the truth, but they’re not” Congressman Wolf told this reporter in an exclusive interview with SFPPR News & Analysis while remarking on how the four State Department employees were forced to sign a “non-disclosure agreement,” whereby they will not reveal what happened at the Benghazi annex on September 11, 2012.

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The Brotherhood’s Currency of Blood

Like all terrorist organizations, the Muslim Brotherhood has only one commodity to trade in. Blood. In the war of ideas for the future of Egypt, the Brotherhood had nothing to offer but the blood of its followers and victims. It has no new ideas. It has no record of accomplishments. It has no vision for the future except the same old corruption and authoritarianism cloaked in a deceptive Islamist garb.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Train of Sacrifices: Israel’s Bloody Rational for Peace

In one of the most famous events in the Bible, G-d commanded Abraham to sacrifice his only son. So Abraham took his son Isaac, bound him on an altar and prepared to bring him up as a burnt offering. And then the voice of the angel called to him and told him not to harm his son. G-d did not want human sacrifices. The Middle East’s Arab-Israeli peace process does.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Czech Soap Opera

A combination of corruption and old fashioned post-KGB active measures ushered in a serious government crisis in the Czech Republic. Whether engineered by the post-Communists or brought about by rightist hubris, or both, the crisis continues to fester and may lead to early elections.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy Tagged , , , , , , |

The ‘Responsibility to Protect’ Doctrine and Proxy Wars

Who will intervene and tip the scales next in the already far too internationalized proxy wars of the Middle East? Will the USA choose to initiate an overt intervention in Syria as it did in the Libyan civil war, under the UN’s multilateral Responsibility to Protect (R2P)? Or can the situation remain as it is?

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, Religious Freedom, United Nations Tagged , , , , , , , |

EU enlargement, Russia and U.S. policy

On November 27 and 28 representatives of the European Union will meet in Vilnius, Lithuania, to discuss the prospects of expanding its borders eastward. The enlargement will also bring with it the expansion of NATO, which makes Russia jittery and compels the United States to take a stand.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

From Arab Spring to Christian Winter

In the Middle East and North Africa, the ongoing civil wars of an increasingly sectarian nature are reportedly putting more and more Christians in harm’s way.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Cuba and North Korea: Brothers in “Arms”

Panama’s recent capture of a North Korean vessel carrying 240 tons of weapons from Cuba, including rockets, missile systems and two MIG 21s hidden among sacks of Cuban sugar, raises numerous questions and provides few answers.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

In Syria, Assad’s Shawarma Republic is Burning

Syria is burning, not because of the Arab Spring or Tyranny or Twitter, or any of the other popular explanations. The fire in Syria is the same firestorm burning in Iraq, in Turkey, in Lebanon and throughout much of the Muslim world. It has nothing to do with human rights or democracy. There is no revolution here. Only the eternal civil war.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

The new Russian periphery in Europe: Azerbaijan and U.S. policy

The new periphery of Russia in Europe consists of the Baltic republics (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania), Moldova, and the South Caucasus republics of Azerbaijan, Georgia and Armenia. Ever since the collapse of the Soviet Union this so-called “near abroad” has constituted a bone of contention between Russia and the West.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Syria’s religious fault lines: the plight of Christians in the Middle East

Though the Syrian civil war continues to rage, it’s mostly defined as a Sunni versus Shiite conflict, where the plight and suffering of this country’s ancient Christian communities is increasingly becoming an influential factor.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, Religious Freedom Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, the Military and Democracy

Egypt’s revolution involved two sets of Western educated elites tugging at a poor post-feudal population that wants cheap bread and some kind of stability, but is filled with simmering anger over a multitude of things.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa Tagged , , , , , , |

Egypt—Lack of Democracy Isn’t the Problem

The globalists, foreign policy wonks, and the media are all in an uproar over the Egyptian military ousting the elected Muslim Brotherhood government in Egypt. Their angst was visible for all to see. On the one hand, there was growing awareness that “democracy” in Egypt under the Brotherhood was not moving towards the dream of a universal Western-style democratic government.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa Tagged , , , , , , , , |

Obama’s Dangerous Nomination of Samantha Power

With the nomination of Samantha Power as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations replacing the infamous Susan Rice, Barack Obama has filled out his second term foreign policy team, and it isn’t pretty. With the appointment of Chuck Hagel as Secretary of Defense, to that of John Kerry as Secretary of State, the Obama administration has unsurprisingly failed to appoint a responsible foreign policy team that is willing to promote strong American interests in the Middle East.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, United Nations Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The South Caucasus and the Importance of U.S. Interests

When the American public learned the identities of the Boston Marathon terrorists, a nation which had relegated Caucasus issues to obscurity was forced to turn to maps and remind itself of the location and significance of this large and turbulent region.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Post-Soviet Russia rattles its saber

Post-Soviet Russia is becoming increasingly brazen and provocative. In late April, the Russians and their Belarussian allies conducted war games right on the frontier of Poland (i.e. NATO) and rehearsed a potential war with that country.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , |

The United States and Romania: Security Arrangements and Mutual Interests

STRATFOR is a professional electronic publication that deals with geopolitical issues and global intelligence. Its founder and chairman, George Friedman, is well-informed and aware of contemporary Eastern European affairs.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Kerry’s Mythological Peace Process: Israel and the Terrorists

Few figures in American political life have been as consistently wrong as often as John Kerry. The former Senator bet on every Communist leader and Middle Eastern tyrant he could find only to watch the wheels of history roll over his mistakes. And now as Secretary of State, Kerry is at it again. In between peddling a Syrian peace process that no one but him believes in, he took a break to peddle the even more discredited peace process between Israel and the terrorists.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Eurasian Customs Union expands

The realization of Vladimir Putin’s “Eurasianist” agenda of reasserting Russian hegemony over the former Soviet Bloc has just scored a significant success. On May 31, the Central Asian post-Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan joined the Eurasian Customs Union (ECU) — consisting of Russia, Belarus, and Kazakhstan—while Ukraine acquired observer status in the Kremlin-dominated body. This article will focus on the latter country.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Smolensk Report summarized: findings of the Macierewicz Commission

April 10, 2013 marked the third anniversary of the Katyn memorial flight that mysteriously crashed in Smolensk, Russia killing the President of Poland, his wife and 94 members of his pro-American government.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Cold civil war in Georgia and why it matters

Ever since Bidzina Ivanishvili’s Georgian Dream coalition won the parliamentary elections in October of last year, a kind of cold civil war has been raging in this South Caucasian country.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Boston Bombings: The Russian Question

It appears the Boston perpetrators, Tamerlan and his younger brother Johar (Dzhohar) Tsarnaev, were homegrown, Internet empowered jihadists. But Russia’s part in the deadly game remains murky.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

Russia’s aggressive war games threaten NATO borders

On April 22-24 the Russians and their Belarussian junior allies conducted war games right on the eastern border of Poland, which is also the eastern frontier of NATO. The successors of the Red Army—Russian airborne assault units and Belarussian special forces, to be more precise—rehearsed the scenario of a war with Poland on a military training ground in Brest, just across the river from the Polish-Belarussian border.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Smart Power Iran

Iran plays smart. We do not – unless the objective is to stay engaged for engagement’s sake. That really worked neatly during the Cold War and we had the Soviets exactly where we wanted them: engaged. Thus, for most of the conflict we did not accomplish anything save for staying engaged. The fallacious assumption was that the impotent engagement saved us from a nuclear war, as if the Kremlin…

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa Tagged , , , , , |

Smolensk: An inconvenient tragedy

Three years have passed since the suspicious Smolensk Plane Crash of April 10, 2010. During this time, new developments in the case occurred and evidence continued to surface. Most disturbingly, these findings have anything but dispelled doubts about the veracity of the official, FSB/KGB-manufactured Moscow-Warsaw “pilot error” line.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Remembering the Legacy of Margaret Thatcher

Baroness Margaret Thatcher, amidst rain and sunshine in London, died on April 8, 2013 at 87 years of age. Even her last day in the United Kingdom was symbolic; Europe, emerging out of a long, tiring, and restlessly cold winter, parallels the political climate in which Thatcher completed her tenure as Prime Minister.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Trouble in Prague

Memory is the most precious weapon to transmit our traditions, which includes the heritage of liberty. Hence, individuals, communities, and nations cultivate memories of triumphs and calamities to derive lessons from the past for today to march boldly into the future.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , , , , , |

Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan: Echoes of Clear and Principled Messages

Modern politics is often fought on the battlefield of the 19 inch or the 50 inch screen with grim bursts of image artillery directed by experts and consultants. But for all the experts and consultants, it is the ability of the politician to communicate what he feels and believes is true that trumps everything else.

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TransCanada’s Keystone XL Pipeline: Under Cover of Darkness

We still don’t know the answer to that question, but a critical segment of the Keystone XL Pipeline is mighty close to conclusion. The map segment referred to as the “Gulf Coast Project” is nearly complete, as a finite pipeline capable of carrying Canadian oil sands from Hardisty, Alberta to Nederland, Texas.

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Posted in America, China, China, Constitution, Defense and National Security, Energy Security, Foreign Policy, Private Property Rights, Sovereignty, Trade & Economics, Transportation Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Obama’s trip to Israel: A long time in coming

Almost 1,400 days after President Barack Obama stood in front of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and hundreds of leaders from the Arab world in Cairo he is finally making his way to Israel.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

John Kerry’s first foreign trip: Much ado about nothing

On March 6, Barack Obama’s new Secretary of State, John Kerry—who succeeded Hillary Clinton as a result of the fallout following the terrorist attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi last September 11 — has returned home after an eleven-day nine-nation grand tour. During his first trip abroad as head of the Department of State, he visited the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Moving Wall of China’s Red Dragon Empire

Beijing views India, Japan, and Russia as strategic rivals, where India must be checked by the geopolitical alignment of China with Pakistan and trade routes must be secured by the so-called “String of Pearls” for the acquisition of vital resources, … Continue reading

Posted in China, Foreign Policy Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Hugo Chavez: Not a Mandela but a Mugabe

In later years, already gravely ill, Hugo Chavez delivered himself and his country into the hands of the Cuban government, surrendering to Cuban advisors sensitive areas of public administration. By Gustavo Coronel | March 11, 2013 Hugo Chavez could have … Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America Tagged , , , , , , |

What if…the U.S. Ended the Cuba Travel Ban and the Embargo?

Lifting the ban for U.S. tourists to travel to Cuba would be a major concession totally out of proportion to recent changes in the island. If the U.S. were to lift the travel ban without major reforms in Cuba, there would be significant implications

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A former anti-communist dissident and the “clash of civilizations” in Poland

On November 23, 2012, in a grave miscarriage of justice, Polish parliamentarian and opposition politician, Antoni Macierewicz, was by a post-communist/left-liberal coalition in Poland’s lower chamber. What terrible offense did Mr. Macierewicz commit to warrant such punishment?

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

The Spread of “Red October:” A Kremlin counter-intelligence virus?

This just in from Kaspersky Lab: Over 300 computers in 39 countries, most notably Russia, were infected with a spy virus dubbed “Red October,” the month of its discovery last year.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia Tagged , , , , , |

Hillary Clinton’s Benghazi Testimony: It Makes All the Difference in the World!

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrived back in the Senate, after dodging a few falling safes, multiple banana peels and an ornery dog named Henry, to give a carefully prepared histrionic rant which can be summed up, “I do care a lot” and “None of this was my fault” and “What difference at this point does it make?”

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

Cuba behind the wheel: Fulton Armstrong & Co.

The infiltration and manipulation of United States intelligence and policy circles by Communist dictatorships has a long, tangled and often embarrassing history.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Latin America, Private Property Rights

John Kerry: Unfit for Duty

November 1971. The Anti-War movement was moving into high gear even as the Vietnam War was fading away. Americans troops were leaving Vietnam in large numbers and the last American offensive in Vietnam had begun the year before.

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Posted in Foreign Policy

Appeasement: Allah Akbar and Ho Ho Ho

In 1997, Mohammed T. Mehdi, the head of the Arab-American Committee and the National Council on Islamic Affairs, lobbied to have a crescent and star go up at the World Trade Center during the holiday season.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

Susan Rice: post-9/11 agent of influence for Riyadh?

The “Holy Trinity” embracing their adopted UN policy of Responsibility to Protect (R2P) in the Obama Administration consists of Samantha Power, Hillary Clinton, and Susan Rice.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

Congress and the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act

If the 20th Century was an era of conflicts and wars, the 21st Century largely has been an era of cooperation, economic globalization and international free trade.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia, Trade & Economics

Mali crisis precipitated by civil war in Libya engenders U.S.-Africa strategy

Northwest Africa’s landlocked country of Mali has now replaced Somalia as the continent’s prime failed state.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

Georgian dream or post-Soviet nightmare?

On October 25, 2012, Bidzina Ivanishvili—the billionaire whose Georgian Dream coalition won the country’s parliamentary elections held on October 1—was confirmed as Georgia’s next prime minister.

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Posted in Russia & Eurasia

A creeping post-communist coup in Poland?

The ruling post-communist/liberal establishment is rolling back freedom and civil rights in Poland. In October 2012, the UK-registered independent NGO, Fair Trials International (FTI), published a report with a disturbing conclusion.

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Posted in Russia & Eurasia

The Kremlin’s Moves in Syria

As Syria is aflame torn by a civil war, Russia seeks several interrelated objectives there.

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Posted in Russia & Eurasia

The Gates of Jerusalem are the new Gates of Vienna

The endless wars with Israel are not really about the Jewish State. Nor are the wars about the Arabs living in the territories that Israel lost in 1948 to Jordan and Egypt and recaptured from them in 1967.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

The pro-Russian Party of Regions retains power in Ukraine

On November 12, 2012, the results of the Ukrainian parliamentary elections of October 28 were finalized and made public.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia

The Cuban-American Vote

For liberal media, academia and others of a leftist persuasion, Cuban-Americans are not so much “Hispanic voters” as they are a persistent irritant and a symbol of a minority hijacked, in the broadminded opinion, by the Republicans.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America

A Moment of Truth in Israel

Seven years ago the Israeli government decided to forcibly evict the Jewish residents of Gaza and withdraw all bases and forces from the area.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

American Intelligence and the Cuban Missile Crisis

Just before noon on October 16, with a carefully-chosen team of hawk and dove advisers arrayed before him in the White House Cabinet Room, the president was told by a senior CIA briefer the precise nature of the threat posed by a Soviet missile installation under construction in Cuba.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America

Obama’s Greatest Foreign Policy Error

Obama’s greatest Foreign Policy error was the same one that had been made by Bush and by numerous past administrations.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

Georgia’s 2012 Parliamentary Elections: Domestic and International Concerns

The long Russian campaign to create a “Eurasian Union” that could challenge the European Union as well as China took another step forward in the most recent Georgian elections.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia

The Cuban Missile Crisis: Fifty Years Later

Fifty years ago, in the autumn of 1962, the Soviet Union surreptitiously introduced nuclear missiles into Cuba.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America

Look to the Lady Who Could Lead

Hillary is facing a Monica moment. With the unveiling of the Benghazi catastrophe, ‘disgraceful, embarrassing and deadly’ is the obvious description used to portray current U.S. foreign policy.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

Katyn Declassified

On September 10, 2012, seventy-two years following the infamous Katyn Forest Massacre, the U.S. National Archives and Records announced the declassification of over 1,000 pages of records on the Soviet-perpetrated genocidal operation.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia

Anti-Saakashvili Forces Win the Georgian Parliamentary Elections

The Georgian parliamentary elections, held on October 1, were a victory for billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili’s opposition “Georgian Dream” (GD) coalition over the incumbent president Mikheil Saakashvili’s governing United National Movement (UNM).

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia

Al-Qaeda in Libya: Assassination in Benghazi

The assassination of the U.S. Ambassador to Libya, Chris Stevens, and three other Americans can be analyzed thus:

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

Anti-American Savages of the Post-American World

The past week has shown us what a Post-American world looks like and it isn’t a batch of treaties that lead to men and women from around the world meeting to decide how to feed the hungry, clothed the naked and take everyone’s guns away to banish violence from the world.

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Posted in Constitution, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

A Bloodless Victory: Obama’s Clean War in Libya

Obama’s clean war in Libya, the one that was won by lying to the UN and then dropping bombs and flying away while ragged bands of fighters whittled away what was left of the decrepit Libyan military, doesn’t look so clean anymore.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, Middle East-North Africa

German Chancellor Angela Merkel Visits Moldova

German Chancellor Angela Merkel is the most powerful woman in the world according to a Reuters report cited by Forbes magazine.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia

The Kremlin’s Premeditated Aggression Against the Nation of Georgia

Four years ago, as the attention of so many was tuned to the Beijing Olympics, the Russians, under the Medvedev-Putin regime, invaded the former Soviet Republic of Georgia.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia

Mitt Romney’s Visit to Poland

On July 30 – 31, former Massachusetts governor and presumptive Republican presidential nominee, Mitt Romney, visited Poland.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy

Universal Muslim Economic Failure

If Romney accomplished nothing else during his Israeli visit, he did manage to offend every single Palestinian Arab terrorist group, all of whom, the Palestinian Authority, Hamas, Islamic Jihad, the PFLP and the DFLP, issued press releases denouncing him.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, Trade & Economics

Romney’s New Middle East Policy

There was once a time when the Middle East was a minor sideline in American foreign policy.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa

Cuba: 52 Years of the Same Old Bad Behavior

The Cuban regime has been conducting a public relations campaign in the past couple of years promoting its so-called economic reforms in an effort to attract foreign investment and, more importantly, foreign loans that the regime has no intention of paying.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Latin America

Obama’s “Polish Death Camp” Remark

Just when Poles and Americans of Polish descent may have felt that President Barack Obama was incapable of offending and disappointing them anymore than he already has, the incumbent once again proved them wrong.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy

The Smolensk Plane Crash Two Years Later: The Unraveling of a Cover-Up?

More than two ye