Book Reviews by Taylor Rose

America’s Borders, Language, and Culture

In Trump’s War: The Battle for America, Michael Savage, the conservative radio commentator has written a book for our time that goes beyond just bashing liberals. His insightful, well presented book is a dynamic and all-encompassing manifesto that lays out … Continue reading

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The Future of Liberty

Reflections on Freedom by José Azel is a superb collection of his most acclaimed columns published in American, Latin American and European newspapers over a ten-year period. Azel’s reflections remind us of the importance of individual freedom, while introducing complex … Continue reading

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Strategic Peril

The high prices for this work are, unfortunately, typical for books imported from the United Kingdom. It is, however, one of the best researched volumes on Chinese President Xi Jinping’s driving vision, his “dream” to return his country to the … Continue reading

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Making Trump a Known-Known in Washington, DC

For Americans or foreigners who can’t, won’t, or don’t want to discern who Trump is – Understanding Trump by Newt Gingrich is the book on how to know and comprehend President Trump, his tweets, and beyond. Speaker Gingrich gets straight … Continue reading

Posted in American Presidency, Book Reviews | |

Short on Real Solutions

A World in Disarray is the title of the book about…a world in trouble. Richard Haass, the author, has an impressive career. He is a former U.S. diplomat, a State Department official, and is now president of the prestigious Council on Foreign Relations…. Continue reading

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Stealth Invasion: Muslim Conquest Through Immigration and the Resettlement Jihad

“The brothers must understand that their work in America is a kind of grand jihad in eliminating and destroying the Western civilization from within and sabotaging its miserable house by their hands, and the hands of the believers, so that … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Islamic Immigration | |

The Iron Lady in Action

Сharles Moore once again vividly explores the widespread triumphs and struggles of Mrs. Thatcher running a national government, this time in the second volume of Margaret Thatcher’s authorized biography. He maps it internally with her Cabinet and corresponding bureaucracies, while … Continue reading

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Employing the West’s Communications Apparatus

While post-election media coverage of Russian involvement in U.S. politics focused on a Democratic Party belief that Russian President Vladimir Putin somehow tipped the scales against Hillary Clinton’s billion dollar presidential campaign, detailed studies show that the Kremlin has a … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia | |

The Economics of Immigration

Immigration has emerged in recent years as one of the most controversial issues of our time. Those calling for restriction frequently argue that immigrants depress wages for native workers and burden the welfare state, while their opponents often dismiss such … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, Immigration Issues | |

Shattering Political Myths

Сraig Shirley is THE definitive biographer of President Ronald Reagan. And this is the fourth volume of that definitive biography. This is an important book because it shatters some of the myths which have grown up in the afterglow of … Continue reading

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Stopping the Progressive Juggernaut

T he left must be destroyed. Not just defeated. Destroyed. The left is not a traditional democratic political movement. It is a cultural phenomenon. Its raison d’etre is the destruction of western political society including American political society. Though termed progressive, … Continue reading

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Europe’s Never Ending Struggle

H eart of Europe: A History of Holy Roman Empire is an encyclopedic study covering over one thousand years of Western European Christianity, roughly from 800 to 1806. Peter Wilson did a detailed job chronicling every event and personality that shaped … Continue reading

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Appeasing the Kremlin

Russia and Putin have been in the news a great deal in the past few months. Admittedly, many of the stories have been shrill and hysterical conspiracy theories about “Russian hacking” purveyed by Democrats still angry over the election results. … Continue reading

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The Strategic Challenge

The book under review is Peter Navarro’s third work that concentrates on the strategic challenge the People’s Republic of China poses to the security and prosperity of the United States; the other two being Death by China: Confronting the Dragon … Continue reading

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High-Stakes Political Drama, British Style

Novels based on U.S. politics have, in the last half-century or so, resonated with American readers. Advise and Consent, Allen Drury’s Pulitzer Prize-winning magnum opus about a Senate confirmation battle over a controversial nominee for Secretary of State, holds up … Continue reading

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A Call to Move Away from Urban Density and Bring “Human Factor” Back to Cities

What is a city for? That’s the central question Joel Kotkin answers in his book, The Human City – Urbanism for the Rest of Us. Today’s urban planners have all but destroyed what once constituted a great place to live. … Continue reading

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The American Presidency

B rion McClanahan, who holds a PhD in American history from the University of South Carolina, is author or co-author of four important books dealing with issues fundamental to our survival as a free, constitutional system. He previously wrote The … Continue reading

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2016 Presidential Campaign Proves a Pivotal Moment

For about 50 years, the issue of firearms controls, and especially mandatory gun registration, has been critically important in American cultural and political debate. Continue reading

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The Strongest Tribe’s Will to Win

Retired Lt. General Michael T. Flynn served in a variety of intelligence posts during an Army career spanning some 33 years, starting with the 82nd Airborne Division. Most of his time was spent with the paratroopers and special operations forces. … Continue reading

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Ronald Reagan’s Association With IKE

More than fifteen years have passed since Louis Galambos and Daun van Ee finished editing The Papers of Dwight David Eisenhower in XXI volumes. The last volume published in 2001 included 1960 and the 1961 transition from Eisenhower to John … Continue reading

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Shadowy Violent Group

Most Americans are aware the goal of Islamic jihad is the destruction of the West, especially the United States which is termed the “Great Satan” by jihadi organizations. ISIS continues to capture headlines and is well known among the American public. However, less well known, but of great importance, is the Muslim Brotherhood (MB). In fact, both ISIS and al-Qaeda trace their roots back to the Muslim Brotherhood. Fortunately, Eric Stakelbeck has written a book, The Brotherhood: America’s Next Great Enemy. While promoting his book, Stakelbeck revealed in an interview with Glenn Beck that without the MB 9/11 could not have happened. He exposes and alerts Americans to the dark, wicked presence of the Muslim Brotherhood and the tentacles it has spread throughout our country. So thoroughly has this been accomplished that there are Brotherhood supporters within the Obama Administration. Continue reading

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Margaret Thatcher’s Culture War

In legendary Churchillian wit, the inspiration for the title of the book embodies both the satirical humor of Monty Python and the very serious views of Denis Thatcher, who thought that the management of the BBC were Trotskyites. The British … Continue reading

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Understanding Reagan’s Teflon Touch

He was a popular GOP candidate, leader, and president – often curiously at odds with the nation’s governing elites, including even the vast Republican Party establishment which eventually adopted him, though never quite completely. Yet, he developed a remarkable bond … Continue reading

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A Challenge to the Progressive Ascendancy

Everybody talkin’ ‘bout heaven ain’t goin’ there.” The most popular vision of heaven these days is the prospect of some version of heaven on earth. The spirit of our times seems to embody so many possibilities. Todd Huizinga in The New Totalitarian Temptation (2016) scrutinizes the “soft utopia” of the European Union’s path to “global governance.” Mary Eberstadt in It’s Dangerous to Believe is equally critical in her analysis of the “neo-puritan” secularism that is directed at “marginalizing, silencing, and punishing its traditional competitors” via the sexual revolution. What seems to be heaven on earth is just the opposite for those on “the wrong side of history.” Continue reading

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Leaving Something to History

Robert Kaplan is a journalist and a writer who possess a good understanding of the world and has a special interest in Eastern Europe. His new book, In Europe’s Shadow, focuses on Romania, but reflects his wide knowledge of the entire area of East-Central Europe. The book addresses a host of regional issues and is many-faceted. It takes up historical questions, old and new challenges, socio-political and philosophical issues, as well as contemporary worries, politics and geopolitics. Equally important is that Kaplan thinks journalists should be completely detached and objective and should approach their missions ‘impersonally.’ Can anyone be one hundred percent objective? Continue reading

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Meteors Colliding: The Election that Gave Us FDR and Hitler

Election years, by definition, are pivotal moments in history. So it is that every four years, leaders summon partisans to the polls with assurances this will be the “most important election in American history,” “most important in a generation,” etc., … Continue reading

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Meteoric Descent

What are we to make of Spiro Agnew? Where are we to even begin? He shone brightly then sputtered and fell to earth. On the verge of the Presidency he departed Washington in hurried disgrace, exposed as a crook and … Continue reading

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A Much Needed Strategy to Fight a Global Threat

Anyone interested in understanding the reasons for the ascendancy of global Islamic terrorism will find Dr. Sebastian Gorka’s book, Defeating Jihad: The Winnable War, truly informative. It is a clear, concise and persuasive analysis of the phenomenon of global jihadism … Continue reading

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European Disunion

Could the European Union, for many a symbol of freedom and cooperation,be viewed from a perspective other than that of a union of states concerned with keeping international peace? Is there something that most have been missing when analyzing this … Continue reading

Posted in Book Reviews, BREXIT, Uncategorized | |

The Left’s Transformation of American Education

Donna Hearne, who worked in the Department of Education from 1981 to 1991, begins The Long War and Common Core, with an example of a simple math problem (164 X 72) using the Common Core math standards and then the … Continue reading

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The State Department’s Destabilization of South Vietnam

The Vietnam War was a long time ago for me – specifically, forty-seven years ago when I served as a Province Intelligence Officer in Chau Doc on the Cambodian border and as a senior analyst in the office of Strategic … Continue reading

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The Great Recession of 2007-08

The title of Bernanke’s memoirs states the theme of this document that focuses on his term as chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. And the term document is appropriate because it is a very detailed … Continue reading

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Some Very Smart People Analyze Common Core

Acommon refrain I’d hear from Common Core pitchmen (such as a state senator from Georgia) was that “a lot of very smart people” support it. These “very smart people,” it turns out, work for non-profits aligned with technology and curriculum … Continue reading

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Conquest by the Sword

“The sword without and the terror within, shall destroy both the young man and the virgin, the suckling also with the man of gray hair.” – Deuteronomy 32:25 Islamic fundamentalists hate the modern world they live in and are focusing … Continue reading

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Unmasking the Frightening State of America

Conservative author and talk show host Michael Savage has published another book – incredibly, his 36th – and it is eye-opening but depressing. Government Zero goes over the dismal state of the country’s current problems due to what Savage describes … Continue reading

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Dethroning the Political Establishment

According to a recent report issued by the Pew Research Center, the American middle class is shrinking, even vanishing. This is a critical, dangerous development. “For decades,” notes CNN, “the middle class had been the core of the country. A … Continue reading

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Martyrs of the 21st Century

Perhaps Robert Royal, author of The Catholic Martyrs in the 20th Century, best captures the essence of George Marlin’s latest book, when he writes, “In the twentieth century, atheists persecuted Christians. In this century, Middle Eastern Muslims are oppressing, driving … Continue reading

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‘The China Dream’

Michael Pillsbury is currently Director of the Center for Chinese Strategy at the Hudson Institute in Washington, DC. He has concentrated on the People’s Republic of China over a career of service to Presidents from Richard Nixon to Barack Obama, … Continue reading

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“Money is their God and Mahomet their Prophet”

History today, especially that generated by “evil, imperialistic white males,” is denigrated by the ‘regressive’ left. (The left isn’t “progressive,” since their regressive ideology yearns for darker periods of authoritarian or dictatorial rule.) Even in better times, when the study … Continue reading

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Treachery! Intrigue! Common Core Skullduggery Exposed

Are you curious about how the crazy new convoluted Common Core math problems came about?  Ever wonder why high school students are reading EPA standards in English class? Want to read a book full of suspense about backroom deals, MOU’s … Continue reading

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Left Wing Orthodoxy and the Fiction of Big Government

Conservative talk radio host Mark Levin’s new book, Plunder and Deceit: Big Government’s Exploitation of Young People and the Future, provides an excellent way to get up to date on the worst political problems facing us today. It is somewhat … Continue reading

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Ted Cruz: The “Right” Man to Watch

In these early stages of the fight for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, it  appears that the outsider anti-establishment candidates are striking a chord with rank-and-file GOP voters.  But will one of them have the strength to prevail in the … Continue reading

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Strategic Management: Another Name for Common Sense

As commander of the Joint Special Operations Task Force, the Task Force that undertook the fight against Al Qaeda in Iraq (AQI), General Stanley McChrystal saw his forces in 2006 increase the number of raids against the enemy from ten … Continue reading

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The Nixon Vice Presidency, Setting the Historical Record Straight

In writing about Richard Milhous Nixon there is much out there that needs to be refuted because, for liberals, Nixon could do nothing right, even when he promoted programs they usually like.  Irwin F. Gellman, in his latest book, The … Continue reading

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Ending Washington’s Two-State Policy

The decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict remains one of the most heated issues in international relations. Scholars and theorists throughout the world offer no shortage of opinions on the matter. Everyone believes their solution is the right solution, and with fervent emotion … Continue reading

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‘Western Civilization is Forbidden’

Virginia Comolli provides a good, wide-ranging account of Boko Haram, the vicious, barbaric Nigerian terror group. In the Hausa language, the term Boko Haram means “western education is sacrilegious.” That anti-western attitude is re-enforced by its first major leader, Mohamad … Continue reading

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Net Assessment: Beyond Systems Analysis

Andrew Marshall has served every Secretary of Defense since James Schlesinger during President Richard Nixon’s second term. However, Marshall came to Washington earlier to work for then-National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger on the reform of the intelligence community. Marshall had … Continue reading

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Soviet Espionage in America

Allan Ryskind, who was raised in Southern California, confronted an enormous challenge when he decided to publish Hollywood Traitors — Blacklisted Screenwriters: Agents of Stalin, Allies of Hitler. He added to his difficulties by identifying himself as editor-at-large for the … Continue reading

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The Bond between Faith and Freedom

It was half a century ago that Ronald Reagan emerged as America’s most eloquent spokesman for conservative principles. In his 1964 speech, “A Time for Choosing,” Reagan demonstrated that he was a more consequential campaigner for Barry Goldwater than was … Continue reading

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What America Wanted Iraq to Be

The Kurds are a nation without a state of their own. They have occupied for centuries territory in Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey. They have their own language but not their own country. After the demise of the Ottoman Empire … Continue reading

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Remembering Reagan’s Battle with the Radical Environmentalists

“With each passing day, year, and decade, Americans learn how fortunate our country was to have him as our president at such an important time.”  -William Perry Pendley It has been famously said that Ronald Reagan “won the Cold War … Continue reading

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A Generation Deceived

Katie Kieffer, political commentator, weekly columnist and popular public speaker stands up for the Millennial generation in what she sees as a denunciation of President Barack Obama’s “war” on Millennials. The current administration has its number of critics stemming from … Continue reading

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Tragedy and Murder in Putin’s Russia

What starts as an entertaining, almost comical account of the early incursions of Bill Browder into the world of Eastern European finance rapidly develops into a story of unparalleled success as an investor in Russia and, finally, into a drama … Continue reading

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Recalling the Disaster of the Nazi-Soviet Pact – Part of a Long Geopolitical History

On the night of August 22-23, 1939, in Moscow, leaders of two of the most evil totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century – the Third German Reich and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics – signed the Nazi-Soviet Pact, also … Continue reading

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The Failure of America’s Welfare Bureaucracies

In a speech for Barry Goldwater’s presidential campaign in 1964, Ronald Reagan pointed to the burgeoning costs for anti-poverty programs. Americans were being told that “9.3 million families in this country are poverty-stricken on the basis of earning less than … Continue reading

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Hard Work, Conservative Values Made Perdue’s Chicken Man a Success

Most people today have heard of S. Truett Cathy, the founder of Chick-fil-A, due to the company’s high-profile conflicts over its Christian values, but there was an original chicken billionaire whose chickens are also still around today.

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The Germans Who Stood Against Hitler

The Nazi regime left a hauntingly tragic mark on the civilized world. The horrors and misery of that period have scarred the soul of humanity. As mankind moves further and further away from that dark stain in its history, the vivid and sinister memories of the Nazi experience shall forever be kept in the memory…

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Leaving Something to History

Henry Kissinger, the well-known and highly acclaimed American diplomat has published a new book entitled World Order, a much needed volume at the beginning of this troubled century. Born Heinz Alfred Kissinger in 1923 in Fürth, Germany located in the Bavarian region of Europe, Kissinger encountered growing anti-Semitism…

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Why the “Reagan Democrats” Stayed Home on Election Day 2012

As potential candidates for the Republican presidential nomination contemplate the political landscape for 2016, they all might benefit from some of the down-to-earth insights offered by the GOP candidate who actually won the Iowa caucuses in the last go-around.

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So Long Sovereignty, Hello Open Borders – EU Style

There hasn’t been much public discourse about the possible merger of America with Canada and Mexico into a European Union-style North American Union (NAU) since 2007. But Diane Francis’ book Merger of the Century, Why Canada and America Should Become One Country, revives and modifies the original NAU idea into a Canadian-American merger, cutting Mexico out of the equation.

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An Inside Glimpse at the Left’s Progress for a North American Union

The North American Idea is one man’s version of the “European Idea,” also known as the European Union – the result of multi-national social, economic and political integration of a disparate people. The authors of the recent Council on Foreign Relations task force report…

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Environmental Fanaticism, Political Corruption and Greed

In early 2009, I received a call from a friend of mine who was working for a Washington DC-based think tank. He told me they had been invited to analyze a legal action started in Ecuador some years before by a group of indigenous people against the Chevron oil company. The plaintiffs claimed that Texaco, later acquired by Chevron, had caused great environmental damage in the Amazon region of South America, where they had operated for about 20 years, between 1972 and 1992. My friend said that they had excused themselves from looking into this because the case had complex political ramifications. He asked me if, as an independent petroleum geologist, I would be interested in taking a look. There would be no compensation involved.

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Zealotry’s Attraction

Rise of ISIS: A Threat We Can’t Ignore by Jay Sekulow is a misleading title. If one expects a book explaining ISIS’s rise, readers will be disappointed. ISIS is a bazaar of violence, a term John Robb explored in his book Brave New War. ISIS has zeroed in on its main focus – Islamic belief – that loosely coordinates and binds different Islamic terror groups together to advance their Islamic beliefs. Robb in his Global Guerrilla blog post of October 14, 2014, titled: “ISIS is the leading supplier of the most potent drug in the world,” and that drug is zealotry. This zealotry has attracted jihadists from 80 countries to come and join ISIS in its attempt to impose an Islamic Caliphate, first in the Middle East and eventually throughout the world.

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The Making of a Landmark Campaign Finance Supreme Court Decision

The recent mid-term elections were the first ones to take place after the landmark Supreme Court ruling earlier this year in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission that struck down aggregate limits of campaign contributions from individuals to candidates and party committees.

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The Generational Loss of American Values

It’s important to understand this new generation of Americans known for their non-American label in John Zogby’s book, First Globals. Born between 1979-1994, today’s college students and young professionals, this 72 million strong age cohort (the biggest since the baby boomers), also known as millennials, thinks of themselves as global citizens, not American citizens. To those of us with strong national identity and a deeply rooted belief in American exceptionalism, this lack of shared values by today’s young millennials is disturbing.

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Exposing the Liberal Heroes of the Women’s Movement

Katie Pavlich’s new book, Assault and Flattery, exposes the liberal heroes of the women’s movement and provides one of the most dynamic arguments against modern leftism. While Ann Coulter exposes the heinous dimensions of leftism and race, so does Pavlich expose the left’s hypocrisy and abusive nature toward women.

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A Life That Spanned French History And Made It

More than three decades after he became the first-ever Socialist president under France’s Fifth Republic and nearly two decades after his death, Francois Mitterrand still fascinates—indeed, captivates—the French as well as politicians and political pundits worldwide.

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How SDI Pushed the USSR into the Abyss

When I was a graduate student during the Carter Administration, pessimism was rampant among those of us who closely followed world affairs. While the U.S. military was being “hollowed out” with budget cuts, the Soviet Union was building up the Red Army massed along the border with Western Europe.

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Posted in Book Reviews, Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia | |

Killing the Future by Dwelling on the Past

Progress, the incontestable desideratum which all modern nations are after and few get to achieve, is the driving force of the twenty first century. Even so, many nations today seem to have come across insurmountable obstacles in their quest to attain such progress. The book “The Arab cocoon” by Tarek Heggy offers an engaging and knowledgeable analysis of the idea of just such potentially insurmountable obstacles standing in the way of development in the Arab world.

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The Road of Good Intentions and the Vested Interest in Race Consciousness

Jason Riley illustrates that old adage about the pavement on the road to hell in a reportorial account that reads with the ease of a memoir. This book is something of a compact sequel to many by Thomas Sowell and Shelby Steele who have busted destructive liberal myths about race.

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Pulling the Trigger on Impeachment

As the liberal excesses of President Barack Obama mount, talk of impeachment inevitably rises in frequency and pitch. His flexing of executive powers to further an aggressive and divisive agenda has prompted both commentators and rank-and-file citizens to raise the issue.

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Posted in Book Reviews, Constitution, Constitution Issues, Foreign Policy, Immigration & Border Security, Immigration Issues, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom | |

Architects of Decline

New York Times bestselling author Dinesh D’Souza has written a chilling book, which is also a major motion picture, revealing how the left is deliberately diminishing America’s status as a superpower by undermining it from within. As America is declining, other countries are increasing in prowess, most notably China, Russia, India and Brazil.

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Great Britain and the United States: The Ties that Bind

If America has Ron Paul, then Great Britain has Daniel Hannan. Both are pro-liberty warriors, bred out of their respective Anglophone environments and inevitably wind up at the same end point: the theme of Anglo-Saxon civilization is liberty.

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Staring into the Abyss

The objective of war is – or should be – peace states Professor Angelo Codevilla in his latest book: To Make and Keep Peace Among Ourselves and with All Nations. According to this logic, the ending of war between belligerents would bring the ending of the conflict and usher in peace between the warring parties.

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The Principles and Ideals of the American Revolution

Lynne Cheney has written what may be the most authoritative and comprehensive book ever on the life of Founding Father and president James Madison. It offers a fascinating perspective into how brilliant Madison truly was – possibly even more so than any of the other Founding Fathers.

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Posted in Book Reviews, Constitution, News and Analysis | |

Belligerent Mind, Vindictive Personality

The news whipped across American intelligence community networks on May 28, 1987. I remember a frenzy of interest, exclamatory phone calls, wonderment. Brigadier General Rafael del Pino – hero in Cuba of the Bay of Pigs, veteran of numerous third world conflicts, confidant of the Castro brothers – had flown into Key West. No such high-ranking military officer had defected before.

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How to Break the Stranglehold

As public sector unions and teachers unions began expanding rapidly in the 1960s (today the largest union in the country is the National Education Association), they abandoned their concerns for students, parents, and their local communities. Since then, our education schools have become training centers for social activists who call themselves teachers but are versed better in race, class, gender, and social justice than they are in the subjects they should be teaching. We have a top-heavy public school system that is more expensive than ever. Teachers who are incompetent or abusive are almost impossible to fire. Pay and job security are based not on performance but seniority.

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Posted in Book Reviews, Common Core, News and Analysis | |

Second Amendment Hurdles and Liberal Hypocrisy

Washington Times columnist Emily Miller has written a jaw-dropping book about the arduous process required to legally own a gun in our nation’s capital. At first glance, since the cover features Miller in a pink tank top holding her SIG Sauer, it appears to be a basic story about a girl learning to shoot a gun for the first time.

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Sacrificed Warriors

“Betrayed” by Billy Vaughn is a shocking revelation of how the Obama administration handcuffs America’s fighting forces with terrible and dangerous Rules of Engagement [ROE], which have increased the dangers to our forces engaged in combat in Afghanistan.

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How John Foster and Allen Dulles Waged the Cold War

With the possible exception of John and Robert Kennedy, no two American brothers had greater roles in making their mark on the world that John Foster and Allen Dulles –respectively, U.S. secretary of state and director of the post-World War II Central Intelligence Agency throughout most of the 1950s.

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Posted in Book Reviews, News and Analysis, Uncategorized | |

Castro-Cuba’s Clandestine Wasp Network

There is an oft told story about an encounter between an American and a Cuban. The American, wanting to extol the virtues of the freedoms he enjoys, proudly proclaims: “I can stand in front of the White House and shout: ‘Down with the president of the United States’ and nothing will happen to me.”

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Dumbing-down the Nation’s Classrooms

A few months ago, I was having a debate with a former Georgia state school superintendent who, along with a state senator (both Republicans), had made a pitch for the Common Core by invoking high educational “standards” and “preparing students for the twenty-first-century global economy.” During our conversation, I complained that Common Core devalues literature. “Believe me,” he replied, “I’m a lover of literature.  I love to read.” Continue reading

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Passing the Torch of Truth and Freedom

How would historians and biographers look upon the 20th century when two immovable ladies, a Queen and a Prime Minister, simultaneously governed the same nation during a period of uncertainty? One would sensibly begin with Charles Moore’s biography about the British Prime Minister who came to be known as Margaret Thatcher. Mr. Moore’s first volume was released in May of this year, shortly after the death of the late Prime Minister. Even when preparing for her eventual passing Margaret Thatcher was capable of choosing a writer who would follow through with a distinctive, yet independent task of telling her story.

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Confiscate all private property

You cannot divorce people from the land, for when you do, it reaps widespread social and economic devastation. This conclusion, drawn by a range of specialists, sums up the consequences wrought by the destructive policies of the green movement detailed in Elizabeth Nickson’s book, Eco-Fascists – How Radical Conservationists Are Destroying Our Natural Heritage. After reading Nickson’s book, one can’t help but conclude that environmentalists are deliberately, systematically destroying property rights and rural communities across North America by promoting and mandating the destruction of the very environment they claim to be saving.

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A Look into Western Civilization’s Future

What do the Roman Empire, the prehistoric Greek civilization of Mycenae and the Egyptian Empire all have in common? Extinction. The book How Civilizations Die (And Why Islam Is Dying Too) by David P. Goldman offers an appealing insight into possible causes for the extinction of many great and ancient societies as well as an interesting analysis into what the author thinks may represent the end of Western Civilization, in its current form. Continue reading

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The Dissipating Influence of the Elites

Big power is crumbling down, in the U.S., in Europe, in Russia. As the Chinese revel in triumphalism, India already challenges its power. In a wonderful insight Naím warns us to “get off the elevator,” that obsession of which country is going up and which down. The 21st century, says Naím, will be no one’s world; the world will be interdependent and will lack a center of gravity.

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Architect of the Conservative Movement

There are many reasons to read David Frisk’s recent book If Not Us, Who? One, of course, is the subject of the book, the late National Review (NR) publisher William Rusher, the “great unsung hero of the conservative movement,” as Mark Levin aptly notes in a blurb on the cover. Continue reading

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Freedom of Mobility

“Little else has given common man access to landscape, mobility, and commerce, as interstates,” observes Tom Lewis is his book Divided Highways, Building Interstate Highways, Transforming American Life. Americans have always prized their freedom, and freedom of mobility is no different. It took forty years to build the interstate highway system, not thirteen years as the Federal-Aid Highway Act originally intended when it was signed by President Eisenhower in 1956. But few national programs have transformed the American way of life so positively as the interstate highway system.

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When Balanced Budgets Mattered

As America’s leaders confront—or try to avoid—the looming twin towers of annual trillion-dollar budget deficits and mounting national debt, the nation nears the centennial mark of a presidency that showed the way out of such profligacy. The president who would become known as “Silent Cal” Coolidge speaks to us anew, and at an important juncture in our history, in an outstanding new biography by Amity Shlaes.

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‘False Dawn’ and ‘High Stalinism’

For years the “basic book” on Communism in Eastern Europe was Zbigniew Brzezinski’s The Soviet Bloc. While it was an excellent and definitive work, Brzezinski did not have access to a mountain of documentation about how dictatorships were imposed on the East European states. With this data, Anne Applebaum has compiled a precise and detailed account of the process by which this was done.

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Frightening Portrayal of Post-War “Might Have Been”

Alternate history—an intellectual “parlor game” played by novelists, historians, and political scientists—envisions the world as it might have been had certain developments in history turned out differently. The late science fiction writer Phillip K. Dick in The Man in the High Castle and British novelist Robert Harris’s best-selling Fatherland both portray a world in the 1960’s two decades after Germany won World War II. Harry Turtledove has made a cottage industry out of alternate history by developing several “what might have been” scenarios into a string of books (including a thirteen-volume series on the uneasy relationship between the U.S. and the Confederate States of America for eighty years after the Civil War ended in a standoff).

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How the West lost Czechoslovakia to the Communists

Could the United States and the West have saved Czechoslovakia from half a century of the communist yoke following the Second World War? Igor Lukes—the author of On the Edge of the Cold War: American Diplomats and Spies in Postwar … Continue reading

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Blacklisted by Higher Education

B ias against conservative professors in academia is getting worse, not better. Mary Grabar, a conservative professor of English, has put together a series of essays by conservative and moderate professors who have found themselves shunned and frozen out of … Continue reading

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Evil Genius

Graduate of Princeton, Fellow at Harvard University, biographer, Robert A. Caro has written four superb volumes investigating the life of Lyndon Baines Johnson, “…a crooked man who walked a crooked mile.” Caro and wife Ina (a biographer and writer in her own right), traveled to Johnson City, Fredericksburg, Austin, Texas, lived, ate and slept LB Johnson, talked with hundreds of knowledgeable people in state and federal government, retirees, friends and enemies of Lyndon, for several long years, and almost became nuisances at the LBJ library.

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Working in the System

Having once been on the dark side, David Horowitz knows his subject of radicals well. In Radicals: Portraits of a Destructive Passion, Horowitz presents us with different types of radicals, with a look into their motivations.

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The Worst Enemy

We are the worst enemy of the West. Or, to put it a bit differently, the most serious adversary is born and bred within the gates of the West. Thus, the battle against mortal danger to our civilization ranges among the denizens of our cultural and political sphere and it must be won here before we can proceed to victory outside.

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Climate Change, Junk Science and Politics

Washington’s Capitol Hill neighborhood once hosted the Trover Shop, one of the best independent bookstores in the whole Northeast. A great place to relax and browse, it had everything from bestsellers, to all the great fiction and non-fiction classics – along with an ample Cliff Notes section for those who liked their shortcuts. Hill staffers could find study guides for standardized tests, and no hobby or interest area was too specialized for the Trover Shop not to carry most periodicals dedicated to cars, boats, computers, model trains, or needlepoint or the outdoors. European news dailies rounded out the inventory.

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Creeping One-World Government

Political commentator and advisor Dick Morris has co-written a book with his wife Eileen McGann explaining why there are legitimate reasons to be concerned about progression towards a one-world government.

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Eliminating Conservatives Once and for All

As I read Neil Gross’s book Why Are Professors Liberal and Why Do Conservatives Care? I was reminded of my stint as an instructor at a low-tier public university in Georgia during the 2004 Democrat primaries.

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Obfuscation, Plausible Deniability, Active Measures and Lies

In May, 1963, Fidel Castro traveled to the Soviet Union to meet Nikita Khrushchev for the first time since the October missile crisis. The purpose of the get-together, according to a report by Pablo Alfonso, was to smooth over their differences and seek additional Soviet military aid.

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Dystopian Thriller about the Very Real UN Policy of Sustainable Development

Conservative commentator Glenn Beck has co-authored a frightening new book about the future of our society under the local auspices of ‘sustainable development,’ called Agenda 21. Although it is a work of fiction, it could become nonfiction.

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A Case for American Leadership in the post-Soviet Sphere

In short, Intermarium (Latin for In between Seas) is a well-researched and well-written book; a balanced combination of theoretical insights with good narratives; an objective study of an area full of subjectivities; and, a thorough summary of important historical events. The book also offers an exhaustive bibliography full of valuable quotations and a much needed alphabetical index.

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Last Great Interstate a NAFTA Highway Fraught with Controversy

With the end of 2012 marking the 20th anniversary of NAFTA, it’s instructive to take a fresh look at the book that chronicles that battle over the last interstate highway – a NAFTA superhighway – yet to be built – Interstate 69, The Unfinished History of the Last Great American Highway by Matt Dellinger.

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Infiltrate, Network, Influence

Communist spies, willing collaborators, benevolent enablers, progressive dupes, lazy bureaucrats, and useful idiots abound in M. Stanton Evans and Herb Romerstein’s Stalin’s Secret Agents: The Subversion of Roosevelt’s Government. The authors are interested in “the oft-neglected link between pro-Communist infiltration of the federal government on the one hand and calamitous policy outcomes on the other.”

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Booking Oil Reserves

In the final notes to his book Steve Coll states that he submitted more than one hundred pages of memoranda on its contents to ExxonMobil for fact checking purposes. The corporation, he says, “was the only party of the dozens reached during the fact-checking process that declined to participate.” He also submitted sixteen questions concerning controversies and lawsuits. The corporation “declined to reply to all of these questions except one.”

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Scalia Repudiates Judicial Activism

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia has co-written a book on legal interpretation with Bryan Garner, a liberal who is an expert on legal language. Although liberal, Garner is equally as concerned about the judicial interpretation of laws that seeks to look outside of the text, instead of looking to the text itself to determine the meaning (“textualism”).

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The Dangerous Truth about Communist Crimes

An apocryphal 16th century story has Polish diplomats meeting their Russian counterparts about yet another Muscovite invasion. The Poles try to reason with the Russians: “Look, you come every year and we defeat you invariably.

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Diminishing an Ideal

To be honest, I did not read Dinesh D’Souza’s earlier book The Roots of Obama’s Rage. I had caught snippets of D’Souza’s interviews in which he advanced his thesis about the anti-colonialist roots of Obama’s “rage.”

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How Globalization Threatens America’s Sovereignty, Security, and Prosperity

Pat Choate’s book, Dangerous Business: the Risks of Globalization for America, is a sobering warning to Americans to retreat from the economic policies that have concentrated power in the hands of the few, hamstrung United States’ national security, and threatened the safety of our food supply, or else lose our national sovereignty and prosperity.

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Transforming American Society

We can thank the Tea Party and affiliated groups for sounding the alarm about a dangerous effort to undermine local governance that is often disguised by nice-sounding names like “sustainability” or “live-able communities.”

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Advancing Soviet Interests

There are books of the political moment that reveal important facts about a candidate. Think of the exposé of John Kerry by the Swift Boat veterans in 2004.And there are books that look at history and give us insights into how we came to where we are.

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Dead in the Water

Do you recall the sickening feeling you had the day you learned of the attack and destruction of the USS COLE in Aden, Yemen, and the instant fury that news provoked?

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Atom Bombs and Appeasement

“What we have to do is talk with them now and say to them we want to be their friends,” Jimmy Carter said.

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Two Houses of Death in the Desert

A decade after September 11, the number of those killed in Islamic terrorist attacks approaches 20,000. Despite the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, despite a decade of outreach and diplomacy, despite a range of approaches from Muslim empowerment to nation building to drone strikes, the numbers testify to the truth that we are no closer to wrapping up the War on Terror now than we were ten years ago.

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The Dangers of American Decline

Is the United States declining, and if so, how is it manifesting itself? What are the causes of the decline? Further, what does that mean for America and, indeed, the world? Zbigniew Brzezinski’s latest book – Strategic Vision: America and the Crisis of Global Power – is a contribution to this debate.

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