Articles by Marek Jan Chodakiewicz

Brexit Happened for a Reason: EU Members Like Poland Ought to Reassess

Polish Prime Minister Beata Szydło wrote a curiously desperate letter of last resort to the European Union to prevent the re-election of her Eurocrat predecessor, Donald Tusk. She appealed to democracy and national sovereignty. This must have sounded like a … Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Sovereignty , , , , , , , | |

Outfits and Trends of Russia’s Cyber StratCom

It would be misleading to posit that Russia’s propaganda works the same way that strategic messaging in democratic countries does or that the Kremlin’s strategic aim is to influence the public abroad directly. It may not always sway the masses, … Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia | |

Russia’s Deception and Denial Machine

The main narrative of post-Communism is that the Russian Federation is unique and, therefore, its system is neither of the West nor of the East. Instead, it is sui generis: a “sovereign democracy,” which in reality is a cover for … Continue reading

Posted in Defense Issues, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , | |

Moscow’s Synchronized Themes and Techniques

Learning Russia’s strategic communications themes and techniques is indispensable to countering them. Otherwise, our approach to the Kremlin’s narrative will continue to be one of confusion and surprise Continue reading

Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , , , , , | |

Turkey’s Presidential Putsch

One cannot help but think that the countermeasures were prepared well in advance. Either Erdoğan was prepared for the coup with extensive proscription lists or he staged a provocation himself so he could proceed with a presidential putsch. The government countermeasures appear too seamless, too well-thought out, and too professional. One way or another, the Turkish avatar of the Muslim Brotherhood is firmly in power. No wonder that Erdoğan referred to the military coup as “Allah-sent.” Perhaps he even helped Allah himself. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , | |

The NATO Summit and Obama’s Much Ado Over a Polish Court

It is too bad President Obama apparently skipped his constitutional law classes while at Harvard. Firm grounding in the American constitutional tradition would help him understand the complexities of Poland’s struggle against the poisonous legacy of totalitarianism in its court system. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis , , , , , , | |

Rule Britannia, and Now What?

Will the spirit of decentralization descend onto central and eastern Europe? That probably won’t happen right away because the denizens of the post-Soviet zone are too scared of the Russians to leave the imaginary security blanket of the EU behind. They keep forgetting that it is not the EU, but NATO that defends them. And there is no NATO without American leadership. Continue reading

Posted in BREXIT, Europe, European Union, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Sovereignty , , , , , | |

Lone Omar and the FBI in Orlando

The American Civil Liberties Union immediately blamed “Christianity” for this horrific murder. Why? It is because Christianity rejects homosexual relations as sinful. Thus, it is allegedly responsible for the massacre in Orlando. ACLU forgot that Judaism is even more stringent on the matter than Christianity. This is as foul an accusation as the disgusting voices (from a preacher in Sacramento, California, to a youth activist in Kazan, the Russian Federation) who rejoice in the slayings of “the sodomites.” The latter are in congruence with the choir in the world of Islam that the gays had it coming. As for the perpetrator, therefore, Omar Mateen is a pure shaheed (martyr) of Allah. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, News and Analysis , , , , , | |

Counterintelligence as Strategic Communications

One may just as well quip that the Kremlin’s strategic messaging boils down to the slogan: “We beat Hitler, we fly the Sputnik, and we excel at ballet.” Unless we re-learn the lessons hard learned and quickly forgotten after the Cold War, we shall be duped over and over again. Continue reading

Posted in News and Analysis , , | |

Christian Slaves, Muslim Masters

Without the multicultural demographic and ideological context, the holy warriors of the Caliphate would stand out like proverbial sore thumbs in the Western world. Currently, they enjoy a perfect environment. They will not let up until Dar al Islam dominates the world. Or at least they will keep trying. The West should oppose that.                                                                                                                     
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Posted in Foreign Policy, Homepage Column One Row Two, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Religious Freedom , , , , , , , , , | |

Ushering in Poland’s Reagan Democrats

The leaders and followers of the populist conservative Law and Justice Party (PiS) consider a symbolic litmus test of international relations the previous center-left government’s egregious manhandling of the Smolensk Polish presidential plane crash in April 2010. They reject the echo-chamber consent of Warsaw’s incumbent liberal regime for Moscow’s ukaze that no foul play was involved in the plane disaster that killed Poland’s president, Lech Kaczyński. They would like an international investigation. This seems to be non-negotiable because the deceased president’s twin brother Jarosław Kaczyński is the head of PiS. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis , , , , , , | |

Cyber Statecraft: Developing a Strategy for Cybersecurity

Instead of waiting for the state to act, a bottom-up army of cyber warriors should be created. They should stand side-by-side with the marching National Guard and paramilitary organizations. If the government can’t protect us from cyber aggression by China, Russia, and others, including non-state agents – as evidenced most recently by the theft of over 20 million classified files by Beijing’s hackers – a U.S. cyber militia and a cyber tea party should rally to the rescue. Continue reading

Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis , , , , , , , | |

The Rising Tide of Third World Refugees and the Plight of NATO’s Southeastern Flank

The Hungarians and others argue that for economic and cultural reasons they simply cannot accommodate the new comers. The Magyars refuse to succumb to the social engineering schemes of Brussels and prefer their country just the way it is. We should watch the European debate very carefully because it also concerns our own problems on America’s southern border. It is not Nazism to wish to protect the nation’s frontier and to uphold its cultural essence. Patriots defend their countries from all enemies: foreign and domestic. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis , , , , , , , , , | |

Moscow’s ‘Spetznatz Day’ is Everyday: Conspiracy, Assassination, and Disinformation

Nemtsov was shot right outside of the Kremlin, a very secure place. Further, he often complained about his FSB tail, a surveillance squad, which shadowed him. Why didn’t they jump to the rescue? Also, a snow plow inched slowly behind the strolling couple, obscuring security cameras.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , | |

Hungary Abroad

The Hungarian politician hopes that because Germany holds neither revisionist territorial designs nor any general historical animus against his nation, Hungary can serve as a useful and reliable geopolitical pawn for both Berlin and Moscow.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , | |

Hungary at Home

According to his admirers, Prime Minister Orban’s third achievement is to restore and rehabilitate Hungary’s past, including its pre-war and war-time leader, Regent Admiral Miklos Horthy. It was Horthy who rushed troops and armored vehicles to the streets…

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis , , , , | |

Russia’s Gift, Turkey’s Move

Moscow’s Vladimir Putin has resolved to send his energy to the European Union via Turkey. Ankara’s Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has accepted for his own geopolitical reasons and for the benefit of the neo-Ottomanist project, an attempt to re-create Turkic political, social, economic, and cultural dominion in its former imperial space, space some Western observers who have judged that the Islamic democracy has thus been merely assigned the inconsequential role of a transit area.

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Posted in Energy Security, Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , | |

Ukraine: What’s Next?

The parliament in Kyiv has just signed a bill granting autonomy to Lukhansk and Donetsk regions in the southeast of Ukraine as Russian President Vladimir Putin indicated was his wish. To sweeten the deal the Ukrainian legislature also voted to associate its nation with the European Union. This suggests a return to the traditional policy of subservience to Russia and cooperation with the West, a fence-straddling posture pursued by Kyiv since independence nearly 25 years ago. Putin got what he wanted, while the West remains rudderless under the Obama administration.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , , | |

The Ukrainian Crisis: Theory vs. History

John J. Mearsheimer’s geopolitical game theory tells him that the West has provoked Russia into invading Ukraine. Moscow behaves rationally, you see, and Washington should have understood that before it expanded NATO eastward and stepped on the Kremlin’s toes. It is logical and legitimate to defend one’s sphere of interest. Why provoke Moscow?

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , | |

Strategic value of Poland and the ‘Intermarium’

The White House’s erratic, confused, and rudderless foreign policy endangers America’s Polish friend, and, indeed, other NATO members, putting Warsaw and the rest, in particular in Central and Eastern Europe, also known as the Intermarium, lands between the Black and Baltic seas, on a collision course vis-à-vis Berlin and Moscow. This is plainly obvious in the context of the Ukrainian crisis.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , , , , , | |

Putin’s Active Measures, Buchanan’s Grief

True enough the Moscovite leader has invoked God routinely. So did Stalin. In public the Georgian mass murderer played the God card whenever it suited him. Places of worship were forcibly closed. Most of them were destroyed. All religions were virtually banned and their followers were exterminated by the millions.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |

Ukraine: Operation Wave

During three long months of increasingly violent demonstrations in Ukraine some observers asked themselves a question about an allegedly imminent crack down. When? And how? One assumed that the government of Viktor Yanukovych, to maintain itself in power and to preserve its credibility, had to act.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia, Uncategorized , , , , , , , , , | |

Get David Satter: Who’s more of a threat to the Kremlin, the journalist or the terrorist?

David Satter (who happens to be an acquaintance of mine) has just been expelled from the Russian Federation. David is no stranger to the masters of the Kremlin. He has accumulated a long track record of annoying them. Having been threatened with deportation as early as 1979 for “hooliganism,” Satter left the Soviet Union three years later under a cloud in 1982.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |

Snowden Forever

This is not to cheer the defector but simply to point out that the phenomena undergirding the Edward Snowden case will continue to metastasize predictably, linger painfully, and haunt us into the foreseeable future. Yet, this awful affair affords us an opportunity to have a long, merciless look at the perpetrator, ourselves, and the damages wrought on the nation. Continue reading

Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia, Uncategorized , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |

No Good Way in Syria’s Civil War

The United States has painted itself into a geopolitical corner over Syria. At the moment, Russia gloats, while China circles above, carrion-like, leaving America with no good moves. There is only lesser evil: in Syria, in the region, and on the global scene. Backing the Alawite-led Bashar al-Assad regime of the national socialist Baath Party is tantamount to restoring the hostile situation prior to the Arab Spring, including Iran’s nefarious influence in Lebanon with its proxy Hezbollah. Supporting the rebels means enabling the Sunnis in general, the Muslim Brotherhood and the al-Qaeda in particular. Make no mistake, the rebels do accept support from the royalist Gulf States, but it is not the sworn monarchists or military secularists doing battle against the Assad regime.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |

The Czech Soap Opera

A combination of corruption and old fashioned post-KGB active measures ushered in a serious government crisis in the Czech Republic. Whether engineered by the post-Communists or brought about by rightist hubris, or both, the crisis continues to fester and may lead to early elections.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy , , , , , , , | |

Boston Bombings: The Russian Question

It appears the Boston perpetrators, Tamerlan and his younger brother Johar (Dzhohar) Tsarnaev, were homegrown, Internet empowered jihadists. But Russia’s part in the deadly game remains murky.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa, News and Analysis, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , , , , , | |

Smart Power Iran

Iran plays smart. We do not – unless the objective is to stay engaged for engagement’s sake. That really worked neatly during the Cold War and we had the Soviets exactly where we wanted them: engaged. Thus, for most of the conflict we did not accomplish anything save for staying engaged. The fallacious assumption was that the impotent engagement saved us from a nuclear war, as if the Kremlin…

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa , , , , , , | |

The Worst Enemy

We are the worst enemy of the West. Or, to put it a bit differently, the most serious adversary is born and bred within the gates of the West. Thus, the battle against mortal danger to our civilization ranges among the denizens of our cultural and political sphere and it must be won here before we can proceed to victory outside.

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Posted in Book Reviews | |

Trouble in Prague

Memory is the most precious weapon to transmit our traditions, which includes the heritage of liberty. Hence, individuals, communities, and nations cultivate memories of triumphs and calamities to derive lessons from the past for today to march boldly into the future.

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Posted in Europe, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , , , , , | |

The Moving Wall of China’s Red Dragon Empire

Beijing views India, Japan, and Russia as strategic rivals, where India must be checked by the geopolitical alignment of China with Pakistan and trade routes must be secured by the so-called “String of Pearls” for the acquisition of vital resources, … Continue reading

Posted in China, Foreign Policy , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | |

The Spread of “Red October:” A Kremlin counter-intelligence virus?

This just in from Kaspersky Lab: Over 300 computers in 39 countries, most notably Russia, were infected with a spy virus dubbed “Red October,” the month of its discovery last year.

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Posted in Defense and National Security, Foreign Policy, Russia & Eurasia , , , , , , | |

Infiltrate, Network, Influence

Communist spies, willing collaborators, benevolent enablers, progressive dupes, lazy bureaucrats, and useful idiots abound in M. Stanton Evans and Herb Romerstein’s Stalin’s Secret Agents: The Subversion of Roosevelt’s Government. The authors are interested in “the oft-neglected link between pro-Communist infiltration of the federal government on the one hand and calamitous policy outcomes on the other.”

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Posted in Book Reviews | |

Mali crisis precipitated by civil war in Libya engenders U.S.-Africa strategy

Northwest Africa’s landlocked country of Mali has now replaced Somalia as the continent’s prime failed state.

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Posted in Foreign Policy, Middle East-North Africa | |

The Kremlin’s Moves in Syria

As Syria is aflame torn by a civil war, Russia seeks several interrelated objectives there.

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Posted in Russia & Eurasia | |

The Dangerous Truth about Communist Crimes

An apocryphal 16th century story has Polish diplomats meeting their Russian counterparts about yet another Muscovite invasion. The Poles try to reason with the Russians: “Look, you come every year and we defeat you invariably.

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Posted in Book Reviews | |