Will Trump Save the 2020 Census?

Under the Obama administration, the Arab-American Institute and other Arab-American organizations supported the Census Bureau’s effort to add a separate Middle East and North African (MENA) racial category to the upcoming 2020 Census. Democrats quietly but effectively sowed the seeds of a politicized Census Bureau by creating new racial categories, while seeking to reduce the “White” percentage that would ultimately be counted in the 2020 Census. The implementation of which would be used to create ethnic Congressional districts favorable to the election of Democrats and increase the number of ballots required to be distributed in foreign languages, such as Arabic.

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By Jay O’Callaghan l August 9, 2017

Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN), the first Muslim elected to the U.S. Congress, introduces Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT) in Dearborn, where he defeated Hillary Clinton in an upset win during the 2016 Michigan Democratic presidential primary.

The recent resignation of Obama appointed Census Bureau Director John Thompson gives President Trump a golden opportunity to appoint the first Census director by a Republican president since 1990, who will run the Bureau during the next major ten-year Census in 2020. Thompson resigned after being plagued with numerous cost overruns on the 2020 Census.

Under Democrat control in the 2000 and 2010 census, the Bureau has become increasingly politicized as it asks questions which seem designed to divide Americans into special interest groups, many of which one political party relies upon for overwhelming support. As one data expert John Wonderlich, executive director of the Sunlight Foundation, told Politico recently, “data is inherently political. And how it’s used depends on who’s collecting it and what they’re representing about the world.”

Democrats and their allies in civil rights and community organizations have pushed major changes for the 2020 Census, which will create new racial categories such as Middle Eastern North African (MENA) and Hispanic, that are designed to eliminate the category of White Hispanics or MENA whites. These new categories have no basis in fact as races and are designed to reduce the White percentage in the Census count while increasing the numbers for certain ethnic group organizations depending upon federal funding while being involved in political organizing. If implemented, this will also provide these special interest groups with data that can be used to promote the creation of ethnic districts which will elect Democrats and increase the number of ballots required to be in foreign languages, such as Arabic.

Under Thompson, the Bureau endorsed these new categories but a final decision will not be made until next April, less than a year from now, when Congress receives the Bureau’s recommendations. Congress will then have the final say in deciding the final wording of 2020 Census questions.

Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson recently expressed concern to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross that the Bureau hired an Obama campaign data analytics firm for Census outreach.

This is not the first time the Dems did something like this.

In 2010, they hired ACORN as a partner for the 2010 Census and did not remove them when Republicans in Congress complained. Finally, they dissolved their relationship when ACORN was exposed in a video by James O’Keefe.

Under the Obama administration, the Arab-American Institute and other Arab-American organizations supported the Census Bureau’s effort to add a separate Middle East and North African (MENA) racial category to the upcoming 2020 Census. Democrats quietly, but effectively, sowed the seeds of a politicized Census Bureau by creating new racial categories, while seeking to reduce the “White” percentage that would ultimately be counted in the 2020 Census. The implementation of which would be used to create ethnic Congressional districts favorable to the election of Democrats and increase the number of ballots required to be distributed in foreign languages, such as Arabic.

The President now has the opportunity to appoint a new director for the Census Bureau that will clean up the 2020 Census by removing Obama appointees who have politicized the Census and bring in new employees who are dedicated to a simpler, less divisive and costly Census. As the late Lee Atwater used to say, “People are policy.”


Jay O’Callaghan has worked extensively with issues involving the U.S. Census Bureau including serving as a professional staff member for the House Government Reform Census Subcommittee, as a senior legislative analyst for the Florida House of Representatives Redistricting Committee and for two U.S. House members. He is also a contributor to SFPPR News & Analysis, of the Conservative-Online-Journalism center at the Washington-based Selous Foundation for Public Policy Research