Trump Effect in Denmark: Reinvigorating Nationalism and National Defense

Trump could indirectly make “it easier for us to criticize politicians like Merkel in Germany and the EU. Trump will be able to change the ways we think and act, especially if he succeeds with his proposals of vetting immigrants, profiling, deportations etc. We would, of course, be inspired.”

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By Taylor Rose l June 29 2017

SFPPR News & Analysis chatted with Karsten Lorenzen, a Danish consultant at the European Union Parliament and a member of the right-wing Danish People’s Party (DPP), currently the third largest party in the Danish parliament, the Folketing, to discuss the fallout of a Trump victory in Denmark.

Throughout the 2016 election cycle, “practically everyone was against Trump even in our own party (the DPP)…but there were a few of us that did support him.” Trump has been “depicted in the media as worse than Hitler,” but Karsten, who is a loyal listener of Michael Savage’s Savage Nation, “knew better” as to the truth of what Trump really stood for. Nevertheless, Danes “were clearly in favor of Hillary and business as usual.”

However, now that Trump has won the presidency, Lorentzen predicts the greatest affect Trump will have on Denmark is regarding defense. A Trump victory means Danes will probably “have to pay more for our own defense.” Despite the establishment hype that Trump is going to jeopardize the NATO alliance by requiring NATO members to pay their “fair share,” Lorentzen is hardly concerned that the debate will lead to the collapse of NATO and thinks it is “only just and fair” that all NATO members contribute the same proportional amount to their national defenses.

“We should be paying more,” Lorenzen said. “Why should American soldiers risk their lives for us. We have to get the will to defend ourselves.”

Currently, Denmark spends approximately 1.2% of its GDP on defense, which is almost half of what it is required to be according to the NATO alliance at 2%. However, Trump’s demands that Europe step up to pay their fair share will very likely lead to a clash between military budgets and the welfare state. In this scenario, even many right-wing parties such as the Danish People’s Party are likely to break with Trump, considering they are at their core, economically social democrats that believe in a large welfare state.

Lorentzen also foresees “many surprises” in the coming Trump administration. He is optimistic that Trump can improve relations with Russia, for Putin “is our only powerful ally in the combat against radical Islam.”

Lorentzen sees the most important elements of Trump’s message being encapsulated in Michael Savage’s creed “borders, language and culture.” Trump stands to reinvigorate “nationalism which has been neglected in the US,” which will trickle down to “bringing back jobs to the middle class, rolling back trade deals that damage the US” and placing America’s interests first over so-called “global interests.” As well, Lorenzten hopes to see Americans rediscover their more ancient heritage though Trump’s presidency in coming to see that “America is based on European ideas – and has a European culture.”

Though Trump has hardly inspired the youth of Denmark and his presidency probably will not radically influence Danish politics, Lorentzen foresees that indirectly, Trump’s insurgent victory could help inspire other insurgency ideas, campaigns, and politicians.

Trump could indirectly make “it easier for us to criticize politicians like Merkel in Germany and the EU. Trump will be able to change the ways we think and act, especially if he succeeds with his proposals of vetting immigrants, profiling, deportations etc. We would, of course, be inspired.”


Taylor Rose is a graduate of Liberty University with a B.A. in International Relations from the Helms School of Government. Fluent in English and German he has worked and studied throughout Europe specializing in American and European politics. He is a prolific writer and author of the book Return of the Right an analysis on the revival of Conservatism in the United States and Europe. He is also a contributor to SFPPR News & Analysis of the conservative on-line journalism center at the Washington-based Selous Foundation for Public Policy Research.

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