America, Globalization and Brexit

The British have just voted to leave the European Union in order to regain their national independence. For England, the vote marks the beginning of a return to common sense. It is a victory of the God-fearing people over the internationalists who advocate a border-less, God-less and very much a meaning-less new world order. We do need an orderly world, but it should be a world of free nations. It is high time for America to regain its sense of nation and sense of mission.

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By Nicholas Dima | June 27, 2016

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After hundreds of years of conflicts, during the 20th Century the world was eventually divided into nation-states. The new states represent a more advanced form of socio-political organization and answer primarily to the aspirations of the people. Yet, to avoid further conflicts, the leaders of the world began to think of some new mechanisms aiming at securing international peace.

The first attempt at global organization was the League of Nations proposed by President Woodrow Wilson at the end of WWI. The project failed because Germany challenged the Paris peace agreements and the Soviet Union tried to impose communism upon the entire world. The second attempt was led by the Allied nations at the end of WWII, which set up the United Nations. This also failed because Moscow continued to promote global communism and the UN was unable to cope with the complexity of the world. Mankind needed a new international body endowed with the power to impose its decisions; it needed a new world order.

By 2000 the world entered an era of cooperating blocs and regional integrations that gave meaning to the word globalization. Globalization, however, represents just the economic side of the political concept of the New World Order. This expression was first used by President Bush Sr. in 1990, when he announced the birth of a new era. What does it mean?

The previous attempts to bring about peace and order on a global scale were political. The current idea is primarily economic. However, there is no economic cooperation without political agreement and there is no global peace without addressing geopolitical claims and disputes. Can the new approach solve the problems? It should be mentioned that globalization is an elusive concept and it is both natural and artificial. It is natural because it is driven by modern technology and it is artificial because it is pushed by big corporations for their own interests. The process also results in strenuous relationships between big transnational corporations and national governments; it leads to confrontation between national aspirations and international interests; and, it feeds a conflict between traditional values and little known new age values.

Currently, America is pushing for globalization. Is Washington’s sustained effort for the benefit of the people? Statistically, the average American has not gained from the process. Politically, the society is polarized more than ever before. And geopolitically, the world is again divided and risky. Russia is challenging America in East Europe and the Middle East, and China is tightening its grip in the West Pacific. Who is winning and who is losing?

The economic polarization of America is already dangerous. From this point of view, Plutarch, an ancient Roman Philosopher, said: “An imbalance between rich and poor is the oldest and most fatal ailment of all republics.” Where does the American Republic stand? The American patriots are already opposed to globalization on economic and moral grounds. Can they stop the current trend? The November 2016 presidential elections are crucial. They can make or break traditional America. But there are some hopeful signs. The British have just voted to leave the European Union in order to regain their national independence. For England, the vote marks the beginning of a return to common sense. It is a victory of the God-fearing people over the internationalists who advocate a border-less, God-less and very much a meaning-less new world order. We do need an orderly world, but it should be a world of free nations. It is high time for America to regain its sense of nation and sense of mission.


Nicholas Dima, Ph.D, is a former professor and author of numerous books and articles including the autobiographical memoir, Journey to Freedom, a description of the effects of communist dictatorship on a nation, a family and an individual. He currently lectures and is a contributor to SFPPR News & Analysis.