Exodus: The ‘March for Berlin’ and the Future of Democracy in Europe

There is legitimate concern over the possibility of sowing the seeds for a majority Muslim Europe. The fact that the continent has been and is still predominantly Christian, is not what ultimately draws apprehension. The truth is that, even if the majority Muslim Europe prediction does not become a reality by 2050, as some have estimated it will, if migration keeps going at this rate, it will eventually become a fact, perhaps during the lifetime of the millennial generation’s children.


By Georgiana Constantin | October 12, 2015

The European refugee crisis has been gathering more media attention as the EU struggles to cope with the continuous influx of people fleeing war and persecution, particularly from Syria. Until recently, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s policy was for Berlin to welcome asylum seekers with an expectation of processing 800,000 by year’s end. The U.S. has officially accepted 1,500 Syrian refugees since 2011. Now, Washington is looking at possibly resettling 10,000 or more refugees from Syria and tens of thousands of other nationalities, although the policy does not have much popular support.

The controversy surrounding the EU’s ability to cope with such situations and whether the concept of open borders embodied in the Schengen Agreement is worth the sacrifice of cross border crime and the inability to properly control migration. Some have argued the current crisis might spell the end of the grand European construction. Others, however, see this as an opportunity to strengthen the aspirant super state by introducing a common European security policy giving Brussels the prerogative to decide. Individual member countries would have to comply with mandatory regulation.

Recently the EU decided to redistribute migrants to different member countries through mandatory quotas, so that the pressure may be taken off of Germany, Sweden, Italy and others that have been principal magnet destinations.

Central and Eastern European nations have, however, been quite explicit about their opposition to mandatory quotas, which would force each of them to help relocate 40,000 migrants, the majority of which are Muslim.

Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Bulgaria, Poland and Hungary firmly stand by their decision to take in fewer refugees than allotted by the EU with a preference toward Christian resettlement, given the greater likelihood of assimilation. While Romania initially expressed discontent with the mandatory quotas, in the end it agreed to take in its allotted share of migrants, stating, however, that it might use EU funds to help with this endeavor.

Other countries have not been so quick to give in to pressure from Brussels. Ivan Netik, the Slovakian Interior Ministry spokesman declared, “We want to really help Europe with this migration wave but… we are only a transit country and the people don’t want to stay in Slovakia.” He also added it might be able to accept 800 Muslims, although Slovakia doesn’t have any mosques.

This sentiment is indeed prevalent throughout Central and Eastern Europe.

While there doesn’t seem to be any clear data on what percentage of refugees are Muslim, Christian or other religions, the idea of having more Muslims in their midst is one of the biggest reasons for concern amongst the EU population. The fear is that such diverse cultural and religious backgrounds will make it difficult for the victims of Middle Eastern conflicts to integrate into their host societies, which would cause much strife for the migrants, as well as the host country’s citizens.

This is not an unfounded fear as the past has shown cases where the newcomers simply refused to assimilate and continued living as if they were in their homeland. Nowadays, examples of increasingly segregated societies abound across Europe.

Serious issues have been made obvious in several European countries, such as France, where, according to Rowan Scarborough writing for the Washington Times, “Paris and other French cities have become more fertile areas for Muslim extremists in the past decade. City leaders have allowed virtual Islamic mini-states to thrive as Muslims gain power to govern in their own way.”

And Britain where “a Muslim group called Muslims Against the Crusades has launched a campaign to turn twelve British cities – including what it calls ‘Londonistan’ – into independent Islamic states,” writes Soeren Kern for Gatestone Institute. “The so-called Islamic Emirates would function as autonomous enclaves ruled by Islamic Sharia law and operate entirely outside British jurisprudence.”

These “no-go” zone phenomenon of cities commandeered by Muslim extremists across Europe or simply an overwhelming population of Muslims who apply Sharia law freely in “their part of town” has reportedly become a reality in Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, Italy and other EU countries.

These parallel societies are causing harm to both sides. On the one hand, they are not allowing immigrants to partake in the freedom offered by their new countries. For example, gender equality, the right to change religions, the right to marry outside one’s religion or the freedom of expression. On the other hand, they are also, unfortunately, recreating the very same societies their people so ardently wanted to escape and for the freedom from which they risked so much to come to Europe.

The controversy around the subject of assimilation and peaceful coexistence seems to have a solid foundation based on current facts and trends.

There is legitimate concern over the possibility of sowing the seeds for a majority Muslim Europe. The fact that the continent has been and is still predominantly Christian, is not what ultimately draws apprehension. The truth is that, even if the majority Muslim Europe prediction does not become a reality by 2050, as some have estimated it will, if migration keeps going at this rate, it will eventually become a fact, perhaps during the lifetime of the millennial generation’s children.

Of even greater concern is the end of European culture as we’ve known it and the viability of European states’ laws. The citizens of EU countries currently have the power to decide their legal and cultural future through the democratic process. If these citizens are of a completely different cultural background, however, then they might not choose to vote for democracy at all. Many fear that Muslims who are now trying to make the EU into segregated entities where Sharia law operates in parallel with the laws of individual states will, in the future, try to transform this land of tolerance and majority rule into a theocracy ruled by the mullahs. And this does not seem to be implausible since most Muslim countries are, in fact, established theocracies.

Adding on to these very sensitive subjects is also many EU states’ realization of having lost much of their liberty already to centralized government. It seems there is a looming fear that tolerant democracy is dooming itself by popular vote. Wouldn’t it be ironic if Islamic theocracy would take the reins of Europe by using the democratic process?

There is much speculation across the continent, as to what is to become not only of state sovereignty but also of democracy, in the face of overwhelming Islamic migration into the heart of Europe.


Georgiana Constantin is a law school graduate who has studied International, European and Romanian law at the Romanian-American University in Bucharest and received her Masters from the Nicolae Titulescu University in Bucharest. Ms. Constantin, who is based in Romania, is also a contributor to SFPPR News & Analysis.