Is religious liberty turning into anti-religious despotism in America?

From the disappearance of nativity scenes across the country to demanding the exclusion of the word “God” in the pledge of allegiance, to banning prayer in public schools, and removing plaques of the ten commandments from courthouses and schools around the nation or, suggesting that they be replaced with satanic statues, people seem to be so caught up in fighting a war on Christianity that they forget these are not only religious symbols but also historical principles and values, dating back to America’s founding.


By Georgiana Constantin | January 7, 2015

From the court case in the UK arguing that Christians are not allowed to wear their crosses at work to the prevalent ban on saying Merry Christmas in many of U.S. venues, Christianity is being attacked on all fronts, in one form or another.

Apart from the suffering in the Middle East and elsewhere, Christians in Europe and the United States  must be more and more apologetic about their beliefs and customs.

One example of this is the U.S. military, which seems to be having trouble respecting the religious liberty of Christians, while attempting to forge a multicultural society.

A CNS News article states, “The Family Research Council (FRC) released a video in time for Veterans Day that warns Americans about the persecution of U.S. troops who express their Christian faith.

The four-minute-and-44 second video, ‘A Clear and Present Danger,’ features active duty members of the U.S. military sharing their concerns about the ‘tremendous culture of intimidation and fear in the ranks of the American military right now.’”

The article goes on to say, “Soldiers give up a lot of privileges or rights to be soldiers and defend the freedom of others,” declares one military personnel in the video. “But certainly the free exercise of religious freedom is not one of them,” also noting that “it’s become increasingly difficult for believers to openly express themselves out of fear of the potential consequences to their careers.”

To make matters worse, as Fox News reports, “several dozen U.S. Army active duty and reserve troops were told last week that the American Family Association, a well-respected Christian ministry, should be classified as a domestic hate group because the group advocates for traditional family values,” suggesting an example of twisted logic.

How can a country claim to offer its citizens freedom of expression, religion or any type of liberty from tyranny when the very politics of the nation has turned against a particular belief system? In Houston, Texas, “the city subpoenaed sermons of several pastors who oppose a recently passed equal rights ordinance for gay and transgender residents. The subpoenas [were] an attempt by city officials to determine how the preachers instructed their congregants in their push to get the law repealed.”

Although the subpoenas were eventually dropped, what does such an attempt say about the state’s interference in religious matters? Is keeping the Government out of believers’ affairs not what the “wall of separation between church and state” in Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists was really all about?

It is reported that “the large majority of Americans – 77% of the adult population – identify with a Christian religion, including 52% who are Protestants or some other non-Catholic Christian religion, 23% who are Catholic, and 2% who affiliate with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.”

And yet, even though democracy is supposed to be the rule of the majority, it is clearly becoming the tyranny of the majority. While it is seen as discriminatory and completely undemocratic to insult Buddhism, Islam or any other religion, in the case of the latter, people even fearing for their lives should they consider speaking out against Islamic beliefs, yet, speaking out against Christianity and trying to find any reason to criticize it is now being looked upon as “cool,” or “the logical thing to do,” or even a “common sense solution to a serious problem.”

Just as the meaning of free speech itself is being redefined, succumbing to the authoritarianism of political correctness, the idea of freedom of religion is quickly turning into what many are calling “freedom from religion.”

From the disappearance of nativity scenes across the country to demanding the exclusion of the word “God” in the pledge of allegiance to banning prayer in public schools, and removing plaques of the ten commandments from courthouses and schools around the nation (Alabama, Oklahoma, New Mexico, etc) or, suggesting that they be replaced with satanic statues, people seem to be so caught up in fighting a war on Christianity that they forget these are not only religious symbols but also historical principles and values, dating back to America’s founding. The Declaration of Independence mentions “Nature’s God” and the “Creator,” while the First Amendment to the Constitution was, in part, enacted in order to protect people from Government intervention in their religious lives. By making anti-religion a state religion, the Government is only imposing social bans on what should be a free and democratic activity.

The United States of America was established as a republic with a favorable view toward minority rights and grave concern over mob rule and factional tyranny.  To try to counter the beliefs of America’s Christian majority by imposing the dictatorship of the minority, who, after having gained religious freedom is now trying to take it away from others, not only defies logic but also speaks to the greater danger of a future when the very fabric of the Bill of Rights is morphed into an unrecognizable despotic regime.

In allowing for such events to occur, America seems to become a blind guide, which will lead the world to spiritual and, eventually, social chaos. Whatever the U.S. does, the world follows, and many countries around the world are beginning to feel the pressure of living in accordance with the anti-Christian mindset which a minority of political interests in America is imposing, including the traditionally Christian group of countries from Eastern Europe, of which my own nation, Romania, is a part of.

Shall it be said that a once exemplary free and democratic nation has turned not only against its own wellbeing but also against that of the world’s? Shall it be said that anti-religion and political correctness are the new forms of tyranny to engulf mankind and that they have all originated in the country formerly known as the “beacon of democracy”? I cannot help but wonder what the future holds for all of us if America fails in living out the freedom it had perfected.


Georgiana Constantin is a law school graduate who has studied International, European and Romanian law at the Romanian-American University in Bucharest and received her Masters from the Nicolae Titulescu University in Bucharest. Ms. Constantin, who is based in Romania, is also a contributor to SFPPR News & Analysis.

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